Thoughts on laughter, by a chancery barrister [B. Montagu.].

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W. Pickering, 1830 - Laughter - 68 pages
 

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Page 20 - A jest's prosperity lies in the ear Of him that hears it, never in the tongue Of him that makes it...
Page 12 - ... from hence to the place from whence you came, and from thence to the place of execution, and there to be hanged by the neck until you are dead, and may the Lord have mercy on your soul ! Yesterday a most excellent sermon was preached by the Rev.
Page 14 - When a righteous man turneth away from his righteousness, and committeth iniquity, and dieth in them; for his iniquity that he hath done shall he die. Again, when the wicked man turneth away from his wickedness that he hath committed, and doeth that which is lawful and right, he shall save his soul alive.
Page 52 - He reads much; He is a great observer, and he looks Quite through the deeds of men ; he loves no plays As thou dost, Antony ; he hears no music ; Seldom he smiles, and smiles in such a sort, As if he mock'd himself and scorn'd his spirit That could be moved to smile at any thing.
Page 60 - ... pleasant pictures and agreeable visions in the fancy, Judgment, on the contrary, lies quite on the other side, in separating carefully one from another Ideas wherein can be found the least difference, thereby to avoid being misled by similitude and by affinity to take one thing for another. This is a way of proceeding quite contrary to metaphor and allusion, wherein for the most part lies that entertainment and pleasantry of wit which strikes so lively on the fancy, and therefore is so acceptable...
Page 30 - See the wretch that long has tost On the thorny bed of pain, At length repair his vigour lost, And breathe and walk again ; The meanest floweret of the vale, The simplest note that swells the gale, The common sun, the air, the skies, To him are opening paradise.
Page 60 - And hence, perhaps, may be given some reason of that common observation — that men who have a great deal of wit and prompt memories, have not always the clearest judgment or deepest reason. For, wit lying most in the assemblage of ideas, and putting those together with quickness and variety wherein can be found any resemblance or congruity, thereby to make up pleasant pictures and agreeable visions in the fancy ; judgment, on the contrary, lies quite on the other side, in separating carefully...
Page 6 - The passion of laughter is nothing else but sudden glory arising from some sudden conception of some eminency in ourselves by comparison with the infirmity of others, or with our own formerly: for men laugh at the follies of themselves past, when they come suddenly to remembrance, except they bring with them any present dishonour.
Page 27 - ... that general visitation of God, who saw that all that he had made was good, that is, conformable to his will, which abhors deformity, and is the rule of order and beauty. There is no deformity but in monstrosity, wherein, notwithstanding, there is a kind of beauty; nature so ingeniously contriving the irregular parts, as they become sometimes more remarkable than the principal fabric.
Page 60 - For, wit lying most in the assemblage of ideas, and putting those together with quickness and variety wherein can be found any resemblance or congruity, thereby to make up pleasant pictures and agreeable visions in the fancy; judgment, on the contrary, lies quite on the other side, in separating carefully one from another ideas wherein can be found the least difference, thereby to avoid being misled by similitude and by affinity to take one thing for another.

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