New Directions in the Study of Meiji Japan

Front Cover
Helen Hardacre, Adam Lewis Kern
BRILL, 1997 - Social Science - 782 pages
This volume of proceedings from the Conference on Meiji Studies presents a rare multinational interchange among professors, researches, and graduate students investigating Japan. The essays reflect both an appreciation of past scholarship and a determination to destabilize existing paradigms about Meiji Japan in favor of a multiplicity of perspectives that privilege subjectivity and non-elite groups.
Attention to relations of power challenges the notions of modernization as the master narrative in Japan's recent history and consensus as the primary characteristic of social interaction in Japan.
The authors present an array of intellectual perspective on topics in the social sciences, humanities, and arts, employing a variety of theories and methodologies.
The book will be welcomed by readers interested in the Meiji era, contemporary Japan, and postmodern theories of power.
 

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Contents

List of Figures and Tables
xi
Four Characters in Search of Modernity
xx
Defining Issues in the Study of Meiji Japan
xxv
Politics and Polity
xxx
What is Meiji
3
Meiji for Our Time
11
What is Meiji?
29
The Formation of Artistic and Literary Canons
35
Changing Korean Perceptions of Japan on
343
Kano Naokis Relationship to Kangaku
358
Shigeno Yasutsugu as an Advocate of Practical
373
State Expansion and Social Response
383
The Shinpüren Rebellion
408
Local Politics in Meiji Japan
440
Local Citizens or Loyal Subjects? Enlighten
451
Kanazawa City Politics
466

Reflections on the Entrance of Fiction into
42
Science History and Culture in the Late Meiji
60
A Reading
90
Fukai Eigo and the Development of Japanese
125
Transmissions
136
The Case
151
Gender Politics and the Construction of the Body
161
The Roles of the Actress in Modern Japan
189
Masters
203
Kanagaki
219
Literary Representations of Self and National Identity
229
Conceptions of Equality in Izumi Kyökas Kechö
246
A Semiotic Analysis of
270
Japan and the World
285
Revision of the Unequal Treaties and Abolition
320
Meiji Japan and the Continent
335
Yoshino Taizo and
476
Contesting Centralization? Space Time
485
Buddhism and the Meiji State
499
Hokkaido Buddhism and the Early Meiji State
531
Meiji Publishing and the Production of Texts
549
Sokkibon in the Diet Library Col
581
The Hakubun
590
Assimilation and Discrimination in Meiji Japan
603
The Meiji State and the Logic of Ainu Pro
612
Promo
635
Mutual Representations and Constructions of Self and Other
656
Japanese Inter
676
An Analysis of Late
688
Hospitals Prisons Museums and Fairs
702
Museums in Meiji Japan
719
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About the author (1997)

Helen Hardacre, Ph.D. (1980) in History of Religions, University of Chicago, is Reischauer Institute Professor of Japanese Society and Religions, Harvard University. She has published extensively on modern Japanese religious history, including new religions movements and religion and the state. Adam L. Kern is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations, Harvard University.

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