What Is This Thing Called Science?

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McGraw-Hill Education (UK), Jun 1, 2013 - Social Science - 316 pages
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A new edition of a classic text in the philosophy of science illuminating the major developments in the field.
 

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Contents

Science as knowledge derived from the facts
1
Observable facts expressed as statements
9
Further reading
17
Observable facts objective but fallible
23
historical
29
Further reading
37
Further problems with inductivism
45
The appeal of inductivism
49
The function of normal science and revolutions
109
Objective knowledge
115
research programs
121
Problems with Lakatoss methodology
134
Further reading
147
Further reading
160
Critique of subjective Bayesianism
173
Learning from error and triggering revolutions
187

Introducing falsificationism
55
Falsificationism and progress
64
Increasing falsifiability and ad hoc modifications
70
Comparison of the inductivist and falsificationist view
77
Falsificationism inadequate on historical grounds
84
Inadequacies of the falsificationist demarcation criterion
94
Introducing Thomas Kuhn
100
Why should the world obey laws?
197
language truth and reality
210
Unrepresentative realism or structural realism
224
Philosophical versus scientific knowledge of atoms
239
Realism versus antirealism again
257
Index of names
278
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About the author (2013)

Alan Chalmers is Adjunct Associate Professor at the University of Sydney, where he taught from 1971, first in the School of Philosophy, and from 1987 in the Unit for the History and Philosophy of Science, which he was instrumental in setting up. Born in Bristol, UK, in 1939, he graduated in physics at the University of Bristol in 1961, and received an MSc in physics from the University of Manchester in 1964. He taught physics and the history of science for two years before returning to full-time study at the University of London, where he received his PhD in history and philosophy of science in 1971. He was elected a Fellow of the Academy of Humanities in 1997 and was a Visiting Scholar in the Philosophy Department at Flinders University from 2000 to 2010.

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