Plutarch's Lives, Volume 6

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J. Richardson, 1821 - Greece
 

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Page 1 - Nor is it always in the most distinguished achievements that men's virtues or vices may be best discerned ; but very often an action of small note, a short saying, or a jest, shall distinguish a person's real character more than the greatest sieges, or the most important battles.
Page 98 - O MAN ! WHOSOEVER THOU ART, AND WHENCESOEVER THOU COMEST, (FOR COME I KNOW THOU WILT), I AM CYRUS, THE FOUNDER OF THE PERSIAN EMPIRE. ENVY ME NOT THE LITTLE EARTH THAT COVERS MY BODY.
Page 231 - Upon this, one of the better disposed Athenians cried out, " Thou art certainly right ; for if we torture Phocion, what must we do to thee?" There was, however, hardly one negative when the sentence of death was proposed : all the people gave their voices standing ; and some of them even crowned themselves with flowers, as if it had been a matter of festivity. With Phocion, there were Nicocles, Thudippus, Hegemon, and Pythocles.
Page 18 - Only stand a little out of my sunshine," said Diogenes. Alexander, we are told, was struck with such surprise at finding himself so little regarded, and saw something so great in that carelessness, that, while his courtiers were ridiculing the philosopher as a monster, he said, " If I were not Alexander, I should wish to be Diogenes.
Page 186 - Caesar's principal friends, withdrew, and hid themselves in other people's houses. Meantime Brutus and his confederates, yet warm from the slaughter, marched in a body with their bloody swords in their hands, from the senate-house to. the Capitol, not like men that fled, but with an air of gaiety and confidence, calling the people to liberty, and stopping to talk with every man of consequence whom they met. There were some who even joined them, and mingled with their train ; desirous of appearing...
Page 13 - Alexander's friends and his mother infused notions into him again, though perfectly groundless, that by so noble a match, and the support consequent upon it, Philip designed the crown for Aridaeus.
Page 208 - Just scaped impending death, when now again We twice as far had furrow'd back the main, Once more I raise my voice ; my friends afraid With mild entreaties my design dissuade : " What boots the godless giant to provoke, Whose arm may sink us at a single stroke?
Page 186 - Brother, help!" After such a beginning, those who knew nothing of the conspiracy were seized with consternation and horror, insomuch that they durst neither fly nor assist, nor even utter a word. All the conspirators now drew their swords, and surrounded him in such a manner that, whatever way he turned, he saw nothing but steel gleaming in his face, and met nothing but wounds. Like some savage beast attacked by the hunters, he found every hand lifted against him, for they all agreed to have a share...
Page 332 - Agis was going to execution, he perceived one of the officers lamenting his fate with tears ; on which, he said, ' My friend, dry up your tears : for as I suffer innocently, I am in a better condition than those who condemn me contrary to law and justice.
Page 94 - Which do you think oldest, the day or the night ?" He answered, " The day, by one day." As the king appeared surprised at this solution, the philosopher told him, "Abstruse questions must have abstruse answers.

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