The Odyssey

Front Cover
Collector's Library, 2011 - Fiction - 407 pages
The Odyssey, translated by T. E. Lawrence, an epic 12,000-line poem composed over 2,700 years ago, is the first adventure story in Western literature. It describes the ten-year wanderings of Odysseus in his quest to return home after the Trojan War. Hounded by the sea-god Poseidon and championed by the goddess Athene, he encounters giants, sorceresses, and sea monsters before finally reaching his beloved Ithaca. There he must endure the taunts of the Suitors to his queen, Penelope, who have taken up residence in his palace. At once enchanting fairy tale and gripping drama, the Odyssey is eminently readable, not least for the rich complexity and magnetism of its hero. An inspiration to writers as diverse as Virgil, Swift, and Joyce, the Odyssey has proved enormously influential and continues to captivate readers of all ages.
 

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Contents

Section 1
7
Section 2
11
Section 3
13
Section 4
29
Section 5
45
Section 6
64
Section 7
94
Section 8
112
Section 15
227
Section 16
241
Section 17
258
Section 18
274
Section 19
287
Section 20
303
Section 21
315
Section 22
332

Section 9
124
Section 10
136
Section 11
155
Section 12
174
Section 13
192
Section 14
212
Section 23
344
Section 24
357
Section 25
372
Section 26
383
Section 27
399
Copyright

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About the author (2011)

The identity of the writer of the Odyssey is a matter of some speculation. The ancients were convinced it was Homer, although they tended to disagree as to biographical details. The best supported evidence suggests he lived in Chios, an island off the west coast of Turkey, some time between 1100 and 700 BC, probably closer to the latter. Traditionally portrayed as revered, old, and blind, he composed the Iliad and Odyssey and possibly the Homeric Hymns, a series of choral addresses to the gods.

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