A History of Literature in the Caribbean: Cross-cultural studies, Volume 3

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Albert James Arnold, Julio Rodríguez-Luis, J. Michael Dash
John Benjamins Publishing, 1994 - Literary Criticism - 399 pages
Cross-Cultural Studies is the culminating effort of a distinguished team of international scholars who have worked since the mid-1980s to create the most complete analysis of Caribbean literature ever undertaken. Conceived as a major contribution to postcolonial studies, cultural studies, cultural anthropology, and regional studies of the Caribbean and the Americas, Cross-Cultural Studies illuminates the interrelations between and among Europe, the Caribbean islands, Africa, and the American continents from the late fifteenth century to the present. Scholars from five continents bring to bear on the most salient issues of Caribbean literature theoretical and critical positions that are currently in the forefront of discussion in literature, the arts, and public policy.
Among the major issues treated at length in Cross-Cultural Studies are: The history and construction of racial inequality in Caribbean colonization; The origins and formation of literatures in various Creoles; The gendered literary representation of the Caribbean region; The political and ideological appropriation of Caribbean history in creating the idea of national culture in North and South America, Europe, and Africa; The role of the Caribbean in contemporary theories of Modernism and the Postmodern; The decentering of such canonical authors as Shakespeare; The vexed but inevitable connectedness of Caribbean literature with both its former colonial metropoles and its geographical neighbors.
Contributions to Cross-Cultural Studies give a concrete cultural and historical analysis of such contemporary critical terms as hybridity, transculturation, and the carnivalesque, which have so often been taken out of context and employed in narrowly ideological contexts.
Two important theories of the simultaneous unity and diversity of Caribbean literature and culture, propounded by Antonio Benítez-Rojo and +douard Glissant, receive extended treatment that places them strategically in the debate over multiculturalism in postcolonial societies and in the context of chaos theory. A contribution by Benítez-Rojo permits the reader to test the theory through his critical practice.
Divided into nine thematic and methodological sections followed by a complete index to the names and dates of authors and significant historical figures discussed, Cross-Cultural Studies will be an indispensable resource for every library and a necessary handbook for scholars, teachers, and advanced students of the Caribbean region.
 

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Contents

Cartography and the Cannibalization of Culture
3
Notes Toward a Comparative History
29
Toward a Centripetal Vision
57
Introduction to a Caribbean Poetics
79
19601980
119
History is Bunk Recovering the Meaning of Independence in Venezuela
161
Oral Tradition and New Literary Canon in Caribbean Poetry
177
Heterology Popular Songs and Caribbean Writing
187
Gabriel Garcia Marquez
251
Collaboration and Revisionism in Contemporary Caribbean Narrative
285
PostModernity and Caribbean Discourse
303
The Politics of Location in Caribbean Autobiography
325
On Transport
339
The Politics of Religion
351
Aspects of Black Dilemma
357
Republican Code Working Conditions and CrossCultural Hybridity in
375

A Carnivalesque Approach
203
Carnival and the Grotesque in the Contemporary Caribbean Novel
215
When Columbus Met Don Juan
239

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