Chinese American Names: Tradition and Transition

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McFarland, 1998 - Reference - 230 pages
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The naming practices of Chinese Americans are the focus of this work. Since Chinese immigration began in the mid19th century, names of immigrants and those of their descendants have been influenced by both Chinese and American name customs. The naming traditions of China are first presented. It is a base for understanding the numerous modifications that may happen to personal names in the interaction between cultures as diametrically opposed as Chinese culture can be from American culture, "itself part of another great tradition, Western civilization." One discovers that surnames are clues to Chinese dialect sounds, that many have been Americanized, that new surnames were created and that, in more recent decades as the Chinese American population has grown, new names practices developed and surnames have proliferated. Included are ideographs to surnames and an overview of their preservation by Americans of Chinese descent.
 

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Contents

Foreword by Him Mark Lai
1
Introduction
7
CHINESE NAME TRADITIONS
13
NAMES AS CLUES TO IDENTITY
59
CHINESE AMERICAN NAME CUSTOMS
93
Stabilizing Surnames
106
Its Only a Paper Name
113
Americanization of Names
123
New Patronyms and Other New Names
139
Surname Clumping and Family Associations
149
WHATS IN A SURNAME CHARACTER?
161
Summary
177
Glossary
193
Selected Bibliography
209
Index
223
Copyright

Transferring Name Traditions
132

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