Capital: A Critique of Political Economy - The Process of Capitalist Production

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Cosimo, Inc., Dec 30, 2007 - Business & Economics - 560 pages
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First published in 1867, Capital, or Das Kapital, is the infamous treatise on economics and capitalism by Prussian revolutionary KARL MARX (1818-1883), who changed history with his 1848 book The Communist Manifesto. In this work, edited by Marx's friend, German philosopher FRIEDRICH ENGELS (1820-1895), Marx systematically analyzes the way the capitalist machine functions. In this academic work written for students and serious thinkers, he explores wages, competition, banking, rent, and the natural laws that seem to govern the development of capitalism without any oversight by the society in which it developed. Originally published in three volumes, Capital is here presented in five volumes. Volume I, Part I covers: . Commodities and Money . The Transformation of Money Into Capital . The Production of Absolute Surplus-Power
 

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Contents

The Limits of the WorkingDay
268
The Greed for SurplusLabour Manufacturer and Boyard 259
288
Chapter XLRate and Mass of SurplusValue 831
333
The Concept of Relative SurplusValue 842
343
CoOperation 853
351
Division of Labour and Manufacture 868
369
The Capitalistic Character of Manufacture 895
405
The Value transferred by Machinery to the Product
422

Chapter lit Money or the Circulation of Commodities
106
Section 2The Medium of Circulation
116
PART II
163
The General Formula for Capital
178
The Labour Process and the Process of producing Surptus
197
The Labour Process or the Production of UseValue 19?
207
Chapter VIIIConstant Capital and Variable Capital
221
The Rate of SurplusValue
235
Section 1The Degree of Exploitation of LabourPower 285
241
Seniors Last Hour
248
SurplusProduce
254
The Proximate Effects of Machinery ort the Workman 488
431
The Factory 467
449
Genesis of the Industrial Capitalist
453
Revolution effected in Manufacture Handicrafts and Domestic
462
Section 5The Strife between Workman and Machinery
466
Section 6The Theory of Compensation as regards the Workpeople displaced
478
Section 7Repulsion and Attraction of Workpeople by the Factory System
488
b Reaction of the Factory System on Manufacture and Domes
504
dustries
514
PART VI
552
Copyright

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Page 15 - My standpoint, from which the evolution of the economic formation of society is viewed as a process of natural history, can less than any other make the individual responsible for relations whose creature he socially remains, however much he may subjectively raise himself above them.
Page 44 - If then we leave out of consideration the use-value of commodities, they have only one common property left, that of being products of labour.

About the author (2007)

Karl Heinrich Marx, one of the fathers of communism, was born on May 5, 1818 in Trier, Germany. He was educated at a variety of German colleges, including the University of Jena. He was an editor of socialist periodicals and a key figure in the Working Man's Association. Marx co-wrote his best-known work, "The Communist Manifesto" (1848), with his friend, Friedrich Engels. Marx's most important work, however, may be "Das Kapital" (1867), an analysis of the economics of capitalism. He died on March 14, 1883 in London, England.

Friedrich Engels is perhaps best remembered as the confidant, colleague, and benefactor of Karl Marx. Engels was born into a Calvinist family on November 28, 1820. The family owned fabric mills in the Rhineland and had business interests in Manchester, England, Engels joined the family business at age 16; he never had a formal university education. Despite his family's industrial background, Engels was sympathetic to the poverty of the working masses. At age 18 he published an attack on industrial poverty, and later joined the Hegelian movement that so influenced Marx and bothered conservative Prussian authorities. Engels first met Marx in 1842, while Marx was editor of a radical newspaper in Cologne. However, they did not establish their lifelong friendship until they met again in Paris two years later. Engels published several works related to economics, the first of which, Outlines of a Critique of Political Economy (1844), attempted to reconcile Hegelian philosophy with the principles of political economy. His second book, The Condition of the Working Class in England (1845), was a damning description and condemnation of the poverty generated by the Industrial Revolution. Engels also co-authored three major works with Marx, the most important being the Communist Manifesto (1948). Engels also wrote several historical works, which are more important to historians than to economists. These include The Peasant War in Germany (1850), Germany: Revolution and Counter-Revolution (1851), and The Origin of the Family, Private Property and the State (1884). In general, these works are more descriptive than theoretical, and they closely parallel Marx's views on industrialization and class struggle. In addition to being a friend of Marx, Engels was his prime benefactor for a number of years. During their early years in London, beginning in 1849, the Marx family was nearly destitute, and it was only through the generosity of Engels that they prevailed. Engels was also responsible for the publication of Marx's Das Kapital. Before his death, Marx was only able to complete the first volume of this work, and so Engels edited and arranged for the publication of the last two volumes after Marx's death. Engels was an engaging and thoughtful writer. It was perhaps his great fortune and misfortune that he was connected so closely to Marx. On the one hand, he was responsible for bringing much of Marx's work to fruition in his role as benefactor and editor. On the other hand, the shadow of Marx eclipsed some of the exposure that Engels's own ideas and contributions might have had. Engels died of throat cancer in London, 1895. Following cremation at Woking Crematorium, his ashes were scattered off Beachy Head, near Eastbourne as he had requested.

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