English Grammar on the Productive System: A Method of Instruction Recently Adopted in Germany and Switzerland : Designed for Schools and Academies

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C.A. Partridge, 1860 - English language - 192 pages

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Page 116 - The place of fame and elegy supply : And many a holy text around she strews That teach the rustic moralist to die. For who, to dumb forgetfulness a prey, This pleasing anxious being e'er...
Page 156 - O LORD, our heavenly ,Father, Almighty > and everlasting God, who hast safely brought us to the beginning of this day ; De(fend us in the same with thy mighty power ; and grant that this day we fall into no ,sin, neither run into ,any kind of danger ; but that all our doings may be ordered by ,thy governance, to do always that > is ,righteous in thy sight ; through Jesus ,Christ > our Lord.
Page 118 - I have nourished and brought up children, and they have rebelled against me. The ox knoweth his owner, and the ass his master's crib : but Israel doth not know, my people doth not consider.
Page 30 - Lupin was, comforted by the mere voice and presence of such a man; and, though he had merely said 'a verb must agree with its nominative case in number and person...
Page 187 - Accent Accent is the laying of a peculiar stress of the voice on a certain letter or syllable in a word, that it may be better heard than the rest, or distinguished from them...
Page 67 - heard," denote things that are past ; but they occurred in this year, in this week, and to-day ; and still there remains a part of this year, week, and day, whereof I speak. In general, the perfect tense may be applied wherever the action is connected with the present time, by the actual existence, either of the author, or of the work, though it may have been performed many centuries ago ; but if neither the author nor the work now remains, it cannot be used. We may say,
Page 161 - ... must be a noun: and, if a noun, it ought to follow the construction of a noun, and not to have the regimen of a verb. It is the participial termination of this sort of words that is apt to deceive us, and make us treat them as if they were of an amphibious species, partly nouns and partly verbs.
Page 122 - If the calm in which he was born, and lasted so long, had continued ;" " and which lasted," &c. " These we have extracted from an historian of undoubted credit, and are the same that were practised," &c. ;
Page 128 - It must indeed be confessed, that a lampoon or a satire do not carry in them robbery or murder...
Page 184 - He will often argue, that if this part of our trade were well cultivated, we should gain from one nation, and if another part of our trade were well cultivated, we should gain from another nation.

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