The Entomologist, Volume 4

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Edward Newman, 1869 - Entomology
 

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Page 14 - The only way to capture the best species is to follow them into the jungle, although a considerable amount of skill is necessary to overcome the difficulties. The net becomes an awkward instrument in a tangled forest, and the only available method is to watch for them in small open spots, and seize upon those which pass, for pursuit is next to impossible. Many of the species fly with amazing rapidity and strength of wing, and in some cases pursue a straight line through the maze of branches, eluding...
Page 14 - I imagine, partly to their frequent battles with one another, in which they whirl round one another with the greatest rapidity, and appear to be incited by the greatest ferocity, and partly to their habit of flying rapidly through the interlacing twigs and foliage of the jungle. Certain species could always be found in particular spots ; the orange and pumilow trees in the plantations always abounded...
Page 36 - E', and therefore vibrates its wings only 330 times in a second. This difference is probably involuntary, but the change of " tone " is evidently under the command of the will, and thus offers another point of similarity to a true
Page 103 - The same locality subsequently yielded as many as were taken on the first day, while all the district round about, though much of it is of the same character, was perfectly clear of them. This tends to show that the species is very local in its habitat. On another spot some miles distant, but of a similar broken character, the species was also found, the area, however, being still more contracted.
Page 226 - The sawdust should be pine-wood and sifted free from chips on the one hand and from dust on the other, so as to be of an uniform size. For storing the species thus collected, a few tin canisters will be found most convenient ; a layer of sawdust is placed at the bottom, and then beetles and so on alternately to the top. The sawdust used in the tins should be damped (not wetted) with a mixture of spirit and one-twentieth part of carbolic acid, which will effectually prevent mould or mites and will...
Page 294 - At the last moult the brown-coloured bands on its six anterior organs of locomotion are thrown off entirely. Escaping from its mined abode, the little creature drops to the ground, and now, every time it is touched, it instantly partially curls its body up, remaining in that position only for a moment or two...
Page 23 - Rapae, exhibiting various shades of colour corresponding with the colours of the surfaces to which they were attached ; and read the following remarks on the coloration of chrysalides : — " All Lepidopterists are probably aware of the very great variability in the colouring of the chrysalides of butterflies, and I am able to state, as the result of some years of observation, that their colours are more or less derived from the objects in their immediate vicinity. It is obvious that this assimilation...
Page 24 - I have hardly ever found except when concealed by nettle-leaves ; those on fences, walls, tree-trunks, &c., being of similar colours to those objects, and mottled more or less. The fine chrysalis of Vanessa Polychloros, when amongst foliage, is coloured like a withered elm-leaf; I have not unfrequently found it of a light reddish brown, with a cluster of metallic silver (not golden) spots on the back at the juncture of the thorax with the abdomen: this colouring also gives place to mottled grayish...
Page 347 - ... within the walls of its cell, and the final work of the larva is to spin a thin silken cocoon wherein the pupa remains until it attains the parent form, about the end of June. Rennie informs us that the carpenter bee (Xylocopa violacea) of Europe " occupies several weeks in these complicated labours," and that as each egg " is separated from the other by a laborious process, the egg which is first laid will be the earliest hatched ; and that the first perfect insect being older than its fellows...
Page 40 - Dr. MOLLER has published a memoir on the influence exercised upon insects by external conditions. One of the most interesting parts is that in which he gives cases where the colour of a species depends on that of its habitat. Thus, for instance, Elaphrus riparius, he says, in sandy districts, is of a clear brown colour; in meadow lands, on the contrary, green. Again, the larva of Amphidasys betularia is yellowish green when it lives on the birch ; ashy gray when on the oak ; yellowish brown when...

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