Who's Afraid of Marie Curie?: The Challenges Facing Women in Science and Technology

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Seal Press, 2007 - Science - 319 pages
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In 2005, Larry Summers, former president of Harvard, sparked an outcry when he suggested that women might not be as innately gifted in scientific and mathematical ability as men. Since then, issues related to the lack of women in science and engineering have appeared in the news, but these sound bites tell only part of the story.

Who’s Afraid of Marie Curie? weaves together research and women’s personal stories, presenting both the challenges and triumphs women experience in the sciences. Author Linley Erin Hall has interviewed more than one hundred women, including students of all ages, to uncover what sparked their interest in science, what they’ve experienced in their careers, and, in some cases, why they decided to leave their field. Her findings are that change is happening, but some women are being left behind while others shoot ahead. Written in accessible language rather than scholarly jargon, Who’s Afraid of Marie Curie? explores the complexity behind the sound bites to present a real picture of women in science and technology.

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Review: Who's Afraid of Marie Curie?: The Challenges Facing Women in Science and Technology

User Review  - Goodreads

Caveat: A depressing read for those (women) trying to pave their way in the science field. I was choked with fear after reading each chapter and could not wait to get this book as far from my sight as ... Read full review

Review: Who's Afraid of Marie Curie?: The Challenges Facing Women in Science and Technology

User Review  - Goodreads

This book contains a lot of valuable information (both anecdotal and research data) about the status of women scientists. As a woman scientist, I found the stories very interesting (comparing my own ... Read full review

About the author (2007)

Linley Erin Hall is a freelance writer and editor specializing in science. Hall has a BS in chemistry from Harvey Mood College, where she was one of 37 women in an entering class of 183. Hall worked as a science writer for the Ira A. Fulton School of Engineering at Arizona State University before becoming a full-time writer. She has written two educational books and edited two educational anthologies. She lives in San Francisco.

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