Bradford's History of Plymouth Plantation, 1606-1646

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C. Scribner's sons, 1920 - Massachusetts - 437 pages

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User Review  - la2bkk - LibraryThing

Author William Bradford was the long time governor of the early 17th century Plymouth settlement, hence has invaluable information to share as to his experiences. Those with only cursory knowledge of ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - patito-de-hule - LibraryThing

This is a print of an historically significant manuscript. For those interested in the history of the Plymouth Colony, it is a very important primary source. Read full review

Contents

I
3
II
23
III
33
IV
38
V
44
VI
49
VII
63
VIII
78
XX
229
XXI
244
XXII
262
XXIII
272
XXIV
290
XXV
296
XXVI
303
XXVII
314

IX
87
X
92
XI
97
XII
105
XIII
115
XIV
127
XV
142
XVI
165
XVII
195
XVIII
208
XIX
213
XXVIII
327
XXIX
335
XXX
344
XXXI
349
XXXII
357
XXXIII
363
XXXIV
375
XXXV
390
XXXVI
394
XXXVII
404
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Page 156 - And he humbled thee, and suffered thee to hunger, and fed thee with manna, which thou knewest not, neither did thy fathers know; that he might make thee know that man doth not live by bread only, but by every word that proceedeth out of the mouth of the Lord doth man live.
Page 95 - ... was the same unto him. But hear I cannot but stay and make a pause, and stand half amased at this poore peoples presente condition; and so I thinke will the reader too, when he well considers the same. Being thus passed the vast ocean, and a sea of troubles...
Page 130 - Happy is he that hath the God of Jacob for his help, whose hope is in the LORD his God...
Page 238 - Indeans, they spent it as vainly, in quaffing and drinking both wine and strong waters in great exsess, and, as some reported, 10 It.
Page 105 - Occasioned partly by the discontented and mutinous speeches that some of the strangers amongst them had let fall from them in the ship: That when they came ashore they would use their own liberty, for none had power to command them...
Page 110 - ... tooles that were stolen away before, and made way for the coming of their great Sachem, called Massasoyt; who, about 4. or 5. days after, came with the cheefe of his freinds and other attendance, with the aforesaid Squanto. With whom, after frendly entertainment, and some gifts given him, they made a peace with him (which hath now continued this 24. years) in these terms.
Page 172 - Concerning the killing of those poor Indians, of which we heard at first by report, and since by more certain relation. Oh, how happy a thing had it been, if you had converted some, before you had killed any; besides where blood is once begun to be shed, it is seldom staunched of a long time after.
Page 107 - Virginia, do by these presents solemnly and mutually in the presence of God and one of another, covenant and combine ourselves together into a civil body politic, for our better ordering and preservation and furtherance of the ends aforesaid...
Page 108 - And of these, in the time of most distress, there was but six or seven sound persons who to their great commendations, be it spoken, spared no pains night nor day, but with abundance of toil and hazard of their own health, fetched them wood, made them fires, dressed them meat, made their beds, washed their loathsome clothes, clothed and unclothed them.
Page 108 - ... their inacomodate condition had brought upon them; so as ther dyed some times 2 or 3 of a day, in the aforesaid time; that of 100 and odd persons, scarce 50 remained.

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