German Romanticism and Its Institutions

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Princeton University Press, May 5, 1992 - History - 454 pages
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Using an illuminating method that challenges the popular notion of Romanticism as aesthetic escapism, Theodore Ziolkowski explores five institutions--mining, law, madhouses, universities, and museums--that provide the socio-historical context for German Romantic culture. He shows how German writers and thinkers helped to shape these five institutions, all of which assumed their modern form during the Romantic period, and how these social structures in turn contributed to major literary works through image, plot, character, and theme. "Ziolkowski cannot fail to impress the reader with a breadth of erudition that reveals fascinating intersections in the life and works of an artist.... He conveys the sense of energy and idealism that fueled Schiller and Goethe, Fichte and Hegel, Hoffmann and Novalis...."--Emily Grosholz, The Hudson Review "[This book] should be put in the hands of every student who is seriously interested in the subject, and I cannot imagine a scholar in the field who will not learn from it and be delighted with it."--Hans Eichner, Journal of English and Germanic Philology "Ziolkowski is among those who go beyond lip-service to the historical and are able to show concretely the ways in which generic and thematic intentions are inextricably enmeshed with local and specific institutional circumstances."--Virgil Nemoianu, MLN

 

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Contents

CHAPTER ONE
3
Institution in Literary Theory
6
Institution in Socialogical Theory
10
Institution in Romantic Thought
13
The Mine Image of the Soul
18
The Belief in the Generation of Stones
27
The Descent into History
33
The Descent into Moral Ordeal
37
The Romantic Obsession with Madness
202
Fiction as a Mode of Psychiatric Perception
206
The University Model of the Mind
218
The Critique of Universities in EighteenthCentury Europe
220
The Situation in Jena
228
Romantic Theories of the University
237
The Jena Mode of Discourse
252
The Image of Halle in Romantic Memoirs
268

The Descent into Sexuality
49
Modern Recurrences of the Romantic Image
57
The Law Text of Society
64
The History of Legal Study in Germany
69
The Codification Controversy
78
The Attraction of Natural Law
86
The Commitment to Traditional Law
94
The Satisfactions of the Prussia Legal Code
114
The Madhouse Asylum of the Spirit
138
Views of Madness in the Late Enlightenment
144
The Impact of Madness on the Arts
153
The Psychologization of Fiction
156
The Finctionalization of Psychiatry
181
The Student as Hero
278
Institutionalization of the Jena Ideal
286
The Museum Temple of Art
309
The Temple as Image in Romantic Aesthetics
321
The Symbiosis of Religion and Art
329
The Artist as Hero
337
The Gallery Dialogue as Genre
355
Institutionalization of the Museal Impulse
372
Conclusion
378
NOTES
387
EDITIONS CITED
423
INDEX
429
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Hegel: A Biography
Terry Pinkard
Limited preview - 2001
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About the author (1992)

Theodore Ziolkowski is Class of 1900 Professor of German and Comparative Literature, Emeritus, at Princeton University. He is the author of many books, Ovid and the Moderns, Clio the Romantic Muse: Historicizing the Faculties in Germany and Hesitant Heroes: Private Inhibition, Cultural Crisis, all three from Cornell.

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