The History of Miss Betsy Thoughtless ...

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L. Garden, 1768 - English fiction
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Page 82 - Shall now my joyful temples bind; •* No monarch but would give his crown, •* His arms might do what this has done-
Page 95 - Forgivenefs to the injur'd does belong, But they ne'er pardon who have done the wrong. He therefore received the interrogatories Mr. Francis was beginning to make, with an air rather indignant than complying which the
Page 72 - in doing which it appears extremely probable, that he had two views ; the one to get money, which he very much wanted, from fuch as delighted in low humour, and could not
Page 73 - performances, or the motives he had for writing them, as the town is perfectly acquainted both with his abilities and
Page 52 - about to all public places, either by the rake, the man of honour, the wit, or the fool, the married, as well as the unmarried, without
Page 72 - except at the little theatre in the Hay-market, then known by the name of F g's
Page 188 - all men were alike to her ; — but added, that it feemed ftrange to her, that a young woman who had her fortune to make might not be allowed to hear all the different
Page 46 - Will a good family go to market ? — Will it buy a joint of mutton at the " butcher's ? •— Or a pretty gown at the * mercer's ?—Then a pretty fortune,
Page 272 - that the too great eagernefs of Mr. Staple gave the other an advantage over him, which muft have been fatal to him from a lefs generous enemy; but the temperate Mr. Trueworth feemed to take an equal care to avoid hurting his rival, as to avoid being hurt by him ; — feeing, however, that
Page 278 - to Mr. Goodman's, in order to fee how Mifs Betfy would receive the intelligence he had to bring her. After paying his compliments to Mr, Goodman, and the other ladies, he came towards Mifs Betfy, and looking on her •with a more than ordinary earneftnefs in his countenance, " Ah, madam, faid he,

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