Page images
PDF
EPUB

for 'plentiful'.” Shakspeare uses the expression, but it is generally condemned.

On page 24, Mr. Gould, in speaking of the word firstly, says;

“No lexicographer has yet ventured to accredit it.”

If Mr. Gould will refer to that dictionary of which, at page 167, he speaks thus :-" It is

simply justice to say, that Worcester's is the only American dictionary which deserves to be

regarded as a standard of English orthogra“phy”, he will find, not only that the word is accredited, but, that authorities are given for

66

66

[ocr errors]

its use.

[ocr errors]

I do not object to the occasional use of first, as an adverb; but, in sentences where it would be followed by “secondly", "thirdly", etc., I

, think that the adverbial form is preferable.

Of the phrase, “I differ with him in opinion”, Mr. Gould says; “Mr. Moon devotes to H. S. D.' no less than a

“column and a half; and, as might be expected, “[Mr. Gould should have said ;- as might have been expected'. That of which he wrote was "past] he leaves the point as he found it; namely “an indefensible blunder, against which the taste, “the ear, and the common sense of every edu“cated man revolt, as a matter of course.”

[ocr errors]

6

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

As a matter of course, Mr. Gould's acquaintance with educated men qualifies him thus to speak; and equally as a matter of course", Dr. Worcester cannot be considered an educated man, seeing that he says, in his Dictionary of

the English Language', page xi ;—“Differ with a person in opinion; from a person or thing in some quality.”

The same excellent work condemns Mr. Gould's strictures on the word “graduated, which, he says, on page 102,“ requires some part of the verb to be before it......

we might as well say 'he born' as say 'he

'graduated'." Was there ever such nonsense written by one professing to teach the proper use of the English language? Worcester says; GRADUATE, v. n. To take a degree; to become a “graduate; to receive a diploma.—He graduated

at Oxford'." Thus I might proceed, and fill column after column of the 'The Round Table' with exposures of Mr. Gould's errors. "The quotation would suffice if Mr. Moon's rule on

“affirmative expressions is correct, but I deny "its correctness."

[ocr errors]

He says;

[ocr errors]

A writer on the proprieties of language should know that the foregoing sentence is not correct. He should have said, either,—"The quotations " would suffice if Mr. Moon's rule were correct"; or,—“The quotations will suffice if Mr. Moon's “ rule is correct."

After finding such errors as these, we cannot wonder that Mr. Gould speaks of Dean Alford's generally accurate style,-'Good English', page 115. “Birds of a feather", etc.

Mr. Gould says;

66

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

“I would like she means 'I should like'] to ask

why Mr. Moon uses the adjective strange for “the adverb strangely in this sentence:- Mr. “Gould's plea respecting a first edition sounds

'very strange to those who remember ’, etc. It is evident from this remark that Mr. Gould would have said ;—" it sounds very strangely to “ those who remember", etc. Strange inconsistency! See what he says respecting the phrase, the trees looked magnificently.— Good 'English', page 49.

Looked" has here a strictly neuter meaning, and therefore should be followed by an adjective; the phrase being, virtually, this :—the trees appeared, to the eye, magnificent. Now, I (not "would like", but) ,

,

should like to know why " sounded, to the ear", must be followed by an adverb, while appeared, to the eye", must be followed by an adjectire. If this is a specimen of Mr. Gould's teaching, those who accept him as their guide must be strangely puzzled by the instruction which they receive.

Mr. Gould seems to conclude that every adverse opinion of his which I do not controvert is accepted by me as being correct. beg that on that point he will no longer deceive himself and his readers; for, it does not follow that, because I do not reply to a certain counter-criticism, I therefore assent to it. Here is an example of what I mean :Mr. Gould had said ;- Good 'English', page 204.

“This passage is more commonly read wrong”, etc.

I expressed surprise that he had not used, after the active verb “ read, the adverb “ wrongly". He replied, that "wrong" is both an adverb and an adjective; and, consequently, that his sentence is correct. I did not consider the matter worth any more words, and therefore left his remarks unanswered; but as he has written again to The Round Table' and said ;

6

6

[ocr errors]

"In due time I trust she should have said, “I trust

" that in due time'] I shall hear Mr. Moon's re"joinder to my comments on that point”.

6

6

[ocr errors]

I give him my rejoinder thus :--I am aware that "wrong" is frequently used adverbially. I am aware also that G. Brown, in his ' Grammar

of English Grammars , pages 667, 670, says;“Adverbs that end in ly, are in general preferable “to those forms which, for want of this dis"tinction, may seem like adjectives misapplied.” “Examples 'By the numbers being con«« founded, and the possessives wrong applied, "the passage is neither English nor grammar.' 'Buchanan's Syntax', page 123. Better thus:

wrongly applied', see page 980. Again,««• The letter G is wrong named jee'. 'Creighton's ' Dictionary', page 8. Better thus :'wrongly "named', see page 980”. As this is the opinion of one to whom, as to an authority, Mr. Gould has referred me, and very properly so, I trust that he will now be satisfied.

With similar short-sightedness Mr. Gould says ;

6

666

[ocr errors]

“I find, moreover, that Mr. Moon frequently uses 80

“in the same manner that [this should be in

'the same manner in which'; see Grammar of

« PreviousContinue »