The Mahabharata, Volume 3: Book 4: The Book of the Virata; Book 5: The Book of the Effort

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J. A. B. van Buitenen, Johannes Adrianus Bernardus Buitenen, James L. Fitzgerald
University of Chicago Press, 1973 - Religion - 582 pages
The Mahabharata, an ancient and vast Sanskrit poem, is a remarkable collection of epics, legends, romances, theology, and ethical and metaphysical doctrine. The core of this great work is the epic struggle between five heroic brothers, the Pandavas, and their one hundred contentious cousins for rule of the land. This is the third volume of van Buitenen's acclaimed translation of the definitive Poona edition of the text. Book 4, The Book of Virata, begins as a burlesque, but the mood soon darkens amid molestation, raids, and Arjuna's battle with the principal heroes of the enemy. Book 5, The Book of the Effort, relates the attempts of the Pandavas to negotiate the return of their patrimony. They are refused so much as a "pinprick of land," and both parties finally march to battle.
 

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Contents

V
25
VI
131
VII
133
VIII
185
IX
187
X
533
XI
557
XII
559
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Page 6 - ... notorious for his punctual collections and his insufficient charities. Who was it who had his head fondly anointed, not only with handfuls of the sublime red powders, but also with a gallon of diesel oil? It was the village landlord, and the anointer was his cousin and archrival, the police headman of Kishan Garhi. Who was it who was made to dance in the streets, fluting like Lord Krishna, with a garland of old shoes around his neck?
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