The Oriental Herald, Volume 20

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Contents

Nature a
113
Hints to Navigators and Discoverers on the Nomenclatures of Hydro graphy and Geography
114
Home
123
Miller on the Administration of Justice in IndiaExpediency of pre paring a Digest of Law for the different portions of the Companys Territory
125
The Confession
137
On Universal Education
139
Inadequacy of the number of Officers allowed to Corps and Regiments of the Indian Army
145
Provinces of the Tennasserim Coast
155
Sonnet ISO 18 Affairs of Ceylon
161
Espionage of the Postoffice Authorities in India
162
Proclamation to prevent Commercial Intercourse in India
163
Extracts of recent Letters from different parts of India
166
Extracts from the various Journals of the Eastern World
176
American Trade in the Straits of Malacca
177
A Dialogue on the subject of Monopoly
178
Indifference of the Press in England to Indian Affairs
180
Burning of Hindoo Widows 1811
182
Description of a Human Sacrifice in Bengal at
185
Courts Martial in India
191
Civil and Military Appointments Promotions and Changes in India
192
Births Marriages and Deaths
195
Shipping Intelligence
196
General List of Passengers
198
JANUARY 1829
199
SongGodlike Liberty a230
230
On the Distinction in the American Colonies arising from Mixture of Blood
231
SongFiora bella re amo
238
Voyage from Bussorah down the River Euphrates to Bushire
239
Greece
249
On the Mitigation of Negro Slavery
250
The Kenite
255
Advantageous Position of Egypt as a connecting link between England and India
256
The Maniac
267
On the Danger to which British India is exposed from a Russian Invasion
269
Historic Sketches written in India 29J 13 Recent French Scientific Expedition to Egypt
295
SongA Wee Drappie ot 3021
302
Memoir of Mr John Fowler Hull
303
Trade of Russia with China
311
On an 111timeU VViah of A Happy New Year
322
SonnetEvening
355
The Press at the Cape of Good Hope
358
Death of Sir E West and Sir C Chambers
372
Civil and Military Appointments Promotions and Changes in India
376
Births Marriages and Deaths 377
377
Shipping Intelligence
378
General List of Passengers
379
On the Trade with China
381
Lines addretsed to a Lady on arriving from India with her Infant Daughter
391
Voyage on the Nile from Cairo to the Cataracts
393
To depart is better
409
The Fountain of Oblivion
410
The Tea Monopoly
411
The Warriors Lady expecting her Lords Return
421
On the Civilisation of Africa
423
QuietIn two Sonnets
434
On the Revenue of the East India Company particularly at Madras
435
Remembrance
444
Emersons Letters from the Mgeaa
445
Sonnet to Autumn
455
On the Administration of Justice in India and the Qualifications and Number of European Judges
456
The Song of the Last Bard
462
Particulars of the Death of the late Emperor Alexander
463
Captain Clappertons Second Expedition to the Interior of Africa
465
Causes of Crime in India and Suggestions for their Prevention
472
Slavery in the Mauritius
475
Sonnet to Slavery
500
Report of the Public Meeting at Liverpool
501
FEBRUARY 1829
538
Meeting at Coventry for the Abolition of Suttees in India
539
The DreamTo Celia
545
Proceedings at Manchester relative to the Opening of the East India Trade
546
Native Address of Condolence on the Death of the late Sir Edward West
557
Attempt of the Bombay Government to intimidate the Judge
561
Free Intercourse between England and India
570
Civil and Military Appointments Promotions and Changes in India
571
Births Marriages and Deaths
574
Shipping Intelligence 677
577
General List of Passengers
578

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Page 20 - Whilst we follow them among the tumbling mountains of ice, and behold them penetrating into the deepest frozen recesses of Hudson's Bay, and Davis' Straits, whilst we are looking for them beneath the arctic circle, we hear that they have pierced into the opposite region of polar cold, that they are at the antipodes, and engaged under the frozen serpent of the South...
Page 20 - Nor is the equinoctial heat more discouraging to them than the accumulated winter of both the poles. We know that while some of them draw the line and strike the harpoon on the coast of Africa, others run the longitude, and pursue their gigantic game along the coast of Brazil. No sea but what is vexed by their fisheries. No climate that is not witness to their toils.
Page 238 - They have a right to the fruits of their industry; and to the means of making their industry fruitful. They have a right to the acquisitions of their parents; to the nourishment and improvement of their offspring; to instruction in life, and to consolation in death. Whatever each man can separately do, without trespassing upon others, he has a right to do for himself; and he has right to a fair portion of all which society, with all its combinations of skill and force, can do in his favour.
Page 527 - The blood of man should never be shed but to redeem the blood of man. It is well shed for our family, for our friends, for our God, for our country, for our kind. The rest is vanity ; the rest is crime.
Page 261 - The public roads were accurately divided by milestones, and ran in a direct line from one city to another, with very little respect for the obstacles either of nature or private property. Mountains were perforated, and bold arches thrown over the broadest and most rapid streams.
Page 20 - Falkland Island, which seemed too remote and romantic an object for the grasp of national ambition, is but a stage and resting-place in the progress of their victorious industry. Nor is the equinoctial heat more discouraging to them, than the accumulated winter of both the poles. We know, that whilst some of them draw the line and strike the harpoon on the coast of Africa, others run the longitude, and pursue their gigantic game along the coast of Brazil.
Page 462 - England has erected no churches, no hospitals, no palaces, no schools ; England has built no bridges, made no high roads, cut no navigations, dug out no reservoirs. Every other conqueror of every other description has left some monument, either of state or beneficence, behind him. Were we to be driven out of India this day, nothing would remain to tell that it had been possessed, during the inglorious period of our dominion, by anything better than the ourang-outang or the tiger.
Page 237 - If civil society be made for the advantage of man, all the advantages for which it is made become his right. It is an institution of beneficence ; and law itself is only beneficence acting by a rule.
Page 260 - All these cities were connected with each other, and with the capital, by the public highways, which issuing from the Forum of Rome, traversed Italy, pervaded the provinces, and were terminated only by the frontiers of the empire.
Page 237 - Men have a right to live by that rule; they have a right to justice, as between their fellows, whether their fellows are in public function or in ordinary occupation. They have a right to the fruits of their industry; and to the means of making their industry fruitful.

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