The North American Review, Volume 70

Front Cover
Jared Sparks, Edward Everett, James Russell Lowell, Henry Cabot Lodge
O. Everett, 1850 - American fiction
Vols. 227-230, no. 2 include: Stuff and nonsense, v. 5-6, no. 8, Jan. 1929-Aug. 1930.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 283 - In all my wanderings round this world of care, In all my griefs - and God has given my share I still had hopes my latest hours to crown, Amidst these humble bowers to lay me down; To husband out life's taper at the close, And keep the flame from wasting by repose.
Page 282 - Tis a note of enchantment; what ails her? she sees A mountain ascending, a vision of trees; Bright volumes of vapour through Lothbury glide, And a river flows on through the vale of Cheapside.
Page 283 - Amidst these humble bowers to lay me down; To husband out life's taper at the close, And keep the flame from wasting by repose: I still had hopes — for pride attends us still — Amidst the swains to show my book-learn'd skill, Around my fire an evening group to draw, And tell of all I felt, and all I saw...
Page 283 - Amidst the swains to show my book-learned skill, Around my fire an evening group to draw, And tell of all I felt and all I saw; And, as a hare, whom hounds and horns pursue, Pants to the place from whence at first she flew — I still had hopes — my long vexations past, Here to return, and die at home at last.
Page 276 - I had rather be an under-turnkey in Newgate. I was up early and late ; I was browbeat by the master, hated for my ugly face by the mistress, worried by the boys...
Page 352 - ... more an assemblage of abandoned and shameless creatures, half naked and half drunk, rather demanding than requesting charity. The prison no more resounded with obscenity, and imprecations, and licentious songs ; and, to use the coarse but the just expression of one who knew the prison well, ' This hell upon earth,' exhibited the appearance of an industrious manufactory, or a well-regulated family.
Page 261 - Exercises in Greek Prose Composition. Adapted to the First Book of Xenophon's Anabasis. By JAMES R. BOISE, Prof, of Greek in University of Michigan.
Page 261 - THE ELEMENTS OF MORAL SCIENCE. By FRANCIS WAYLAND, DD, President of Brown University, and Professor of Moral Philosophy.
Page 12 - So he turned his sharpened ear, and caught the wailing tone, Where Jusuf, by his mother's grave, lay making heavy moan. And the negro hurried up, and gave him there a blow ; So quick and cruel was it, that it instant laid him low ;
Page 158 - Wit laughs at things ; Humor laughs with them. Wit lashes external appearances, or cunningly exaggerates single foibles into character ; Humor glides into the heart of its object, looks lovingly on the infirmities it detects, and represents the whole man. "Wit is abrupt, darting, scornful, and tosses its analogies in your face ; Humor is slow and shy, insinuating its fun into your heart.

Bibliographic information