Familiar Lessons on Physiology: Designed for the Use of Children and Youth in Schools and Families : Illustrated by Numerous Engravings, Volume 1

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Fowlers and Wells, 1848 - Phrenology - 95 pages
 

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Page 23 - What is one great reason that tobacco should not be need t to her acquaintance this filthy weed ; for those who use it are daily losing that saliva which ought to be saved for the mastication of their food. 48. Man has only one stomach, and this is all he needs in the digestion of his food, and in preparing it for blood ; but we see that different animals require and have different stomachs : some two, three, or four, as the occasion may require. 49. Lobsters and crabs have a very singular stomach....
Page 57 - ... are branches of the artery going to the two sides of the lungs, which carry the blood there ; m, m, the veins which bring the blood back from the lungs to the left side of the heart ; n, is the right auricle ; o and p, are the ascending and...
Page 35 - They say that it does them no harm, and that they cannot live without it. They take it, they say, as a stimulant, or to excite them. In reality it does excite their nerves, and their minds become weakened by it. It is better to drink clear, cold water ; the drink which nature has provided for us. 8. It is pleasant for us to enjoy food, and it is well that it is so ; for if it were not the case, many would become so much absorbed in their different pursuits that they would forget to eat, and...
Page 11 - The eye of the infant is larger, in proportion to the size of the body, than that of the adult; but it is by no means certain that the eye of the male is larger proportionately to the size of the body than the eye of the female. By some anatomists the human eye...
Page 138 - In G-ermany every child is taught to use its voice while young. In their schools all join in singing, as a regular exercise, as much as they attend to the study of geography ; and in their churches the singing is not confined to a choir, who sit apart from the others, perhaps in one corner of the house, but there is a vast tide of incense going forth to God from every heart which can give utterance to this language of the soul.
Page 183 - Besides important remarks on the Temperaments, it contains a description of all the primary mental powers, in seven different degrees of development, together with the combinations of the faculties ; in short, we regard this work as not only the most important of any which has before been written on the science, but as indispensably necessary to the student who wishes to acquire a thorough knowledge of Phrenological Science.
Page 64 - ... for the circulation of the blood, unless it were for that specific purpose, and for that alone. 22. Thirdly ; It has been said that the circulation of the blood through the veins and arteries may be seen by a microscope — an instrument by which the smallest object may be seen — in some of the delicate parts of different animals, as in the web of a frog's foot. 23. Fourthly ; The way in which bleeding from a vein is performed, is another proof of the circulation of the blood. A tight bandage...
Page 149 - ... closed by the pan, holding water and ^preventing the constant passage backward of gas when the closet is not in use. But when the handle is drawn up the pan is deflected downwards so as to discharge its contents into the receiver, as shown in the diagram ; and as two bodies cannot occupy the same space at the same time...
Page 49 - Fontana, the master workman, had forbidden all talking, and they now stood holding upon the tackles, so silently, you might have heard a whisper. " Suddenly an English sailor cried out,
Page 175 - AIH. 205 HEARING. 1. The ear is the organ of hearing. It has many divisions, which I am afraid you would not remember if I should tell you. The nerve which conveys impressions to the brain is called the auditory. The ear has no opening into the brain, so that insects which sometimes find their way into the ear, could not — as many suppose — crawl into the head, although they frequently produce considerable pain. 2. By sound is meant vibrations from the body, which reach the ear. When persons...

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