Kamilaroi, Dippil, and Turrubul: languages spoken by Australian aborigines

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Government Printer, 1866 - Aboriginal Australians - 88 pages
Kamilaroi: the language of the aborigines of the Namoi, Barwan, Bundarra and Balonne Rivers, and of Liverpool Plains and the Upper Hunter.
 

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Page 88 - Tonrai (Little Country) to the newly-discovered land ; and as they passed onward to the south and west, and found out somewhat of the vast extent of the country, the necessities and jealousies of the numerous families that followed them forbade their return. The current of migration was ever onward towards the south and west ; and therefore the north-eastern corner of Australia was always the dwelling-place of a people ignorant of the vast expanse beyond them, and willing to call it still Kai Dowdai...
Page 5 - Nouns are declined by suffixes. " There are two nominative cases ; the first simply naming the object of attention, the second indicating the agent of the act described in a verb. " Often, however, the agent suffix is omitted, even before an active verb. " The suffixes are -du (the sign of the agent...
Page 36 - Thus the mother's names, not the father's, determined the names of the child in every case. " The children in no case take the first names of their parents, yet their names are determined invariably by the names of their parents. The effects of these rules, in passing every family through each of the four classes in as many generations, and in preventing the intermarriage of near relations, will appear on inspection of this pedigree : — "1st Gen.
Page 17 - The Kamilaroi blacks say that Baia-me made all things ; that he is resting away in the far west. They never saw him, but regard thunder as his voice. Spirit, ghost, or subordinate deity wunda. In all parts of Eastern Australia the aborigines apply the word which commonly signifies spirit, demon, or angel, to the white man. About Moreton Bay " makoron" and " mudhero" signify ghost, and each of these words is applied to white men. So- the Namoi and Barwan blacks call white men
Page 33 - The lame man leapt, walked also. Many people saw, they wondered, they cried aloud " Gods two are come down like men." Paul, Barnabas also ran, cried aloud " Have done! not we gods ; we men like you. We glad become, we sorry become, we angry become, again we are reconciled. "We good tell to all ; cease ye any more evil to be ; turn ye, look to God the living. God, verily, heaven, earth, the great water, all, everything made. God always is God
Page 33 - The lame man leapt, walked also. All the people saw, they wondeied, they cried aloud " Gods two are come down like men." Paul, Barnabas also ran, cried aloud " Have done ! not we gods; we men like you. We glad become, we sorry become, we angry become, again we are reconciled. We good tell to all; cease ye any more evil to be; turn ye, look to God the living.
Page 87 - As they have no knowledge of the extent of the country they inhabit, the names given to the land can only be regarded as the names of small districts. At Cape York, Australia, as known to the inhabitants of that coast, is called " Kai Dowdai " (which I suppose to mean " Little Country"), in contradistinction to "Muggi Dowdai" ("Great Country"), that is, New Guinea. Mr. M'Gillivray, in his narrative of the expedition of the Rattlesnake, gives the above as the names used by the aborigines for Australia...
Page 6 - Pronouns are declined in some respects like nouns. They have distinct dual and plural forms. All the personal pronouns begin with the nasal ng.

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