The Law of Landlord and Tenant: Including the Practice in Ejectment

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Reeves & Turner, 1893 - Ejectment - 677 pages
 

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Page 82 - ... rights, and advantages whatsoever appertaining, or reputed to appertain to the land, Ortain covenant* to be implied. Conveyance. houses, or other buildings conveyed, or any of them, or any part thereof...
Page 56 - This section applies only if and as far as a contrary intention is not expressed...
Page 237 - Ought this inconvenience to be considered in fact as more than fanciful, more than one of mere delicacy or fastidiousness, as an inconvenience materially interfering with the ordinary comfort, physically, of human existence, not merely according to elegant or dainty modes and habits of living, but according to plain and sober and simple notions among the English people?
Page 371 - A right of re-entry or forfeiture under any proviso or stipulation in a lease, for a breach of any covenant or condition in the lease, shall not be enforceable, by action or otherwise, unless and until the lessor serves on the lessee a notice — specifying the particular breach complained of...
Page 434 - And be it further enacted, that when any person shall be in possession or in receipt of the profits of any land, or in receipt of any rent, as tenant at will, the right of the person entitled subject thereto, or of the person through whom he claims, to make an entry or distress or...
Page 73 - ... all leases, estates, interests of freehold or terms of years, or any uncertain interest of, in, to or out of any messuages, manors, lands, tenements or hereditaments made or created by livery and seisin only, or by parol, and not put in writing and signed by the parties so making or creating the same, or their agents thereunto lawfully authorized by writing, shall have the force and effect of leases or estates at will only...
Page 412 - ... means any parcel of land held by a tenant, which is either wholly agricultural or wholly pastoral, or in part agricultural and as to the residue pastoral, or in whole or in part cultivated as a market garden, and which is not let to the tenant during his continuance in any office, appointment, or employment held under the landlord...
Page 76 - It may be laid down for a rule, that, whatever words are sufficient to explain the intent of the parties, that the one shall divest himself of the possession, and the other come into it, for such a determinate time, such words, whether they run in the form of a license,, covenant, or agreement, are of themselves sufficient, and will in construction of law amount to a lease for years as effectually as if the most proper and pertinent words had been made use of for that purpose...
Page 79 - is clearly settled, that when there is a sufficient description set forth of premises by giving the particular name of a close, or otherwise, we may reject a false demonstration ; but that, if the premises be described in general terms, and a particular description be added, the latter controls the former.
Page 114 - The fourth section enacts, that no action shall be brought whereby to charge any person upon any agreement made upon any contract or sale of lands, tenements, or hereditaments, or any interest in or concerning them, unless the agreement upon which such action shall be brought, or some memorandum or note thereof, shall be in writing and signed by the party to be charged therewith, or some other person thereunto by him lawfully authorized.

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