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3 18 10 16 10 37 6.5 8.55 P.M. Capel. N. 7 17 12 23 5 9 8 27 2 23 9 24 17 3 38 3 58 10 57 11 17 6.5 8.13 P.M. Ald. S.

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6 8 6 27 1 9

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7 12 13 35 5 16
1 33 6 32 11 32 23 7 35

8 2
2 29

2 54.5.6 1.37 P.M. Ó(. 7 II 13 44 5 17 2 361 7 19 3:24

3 3 21 3 50 5.4 5.36 P.M. h sets. ASTRONOMICAL INFORMATION, Etc. Chronological Cycles.

Abbreviations. Dominical Letter.....

с 2 Ascending node.

0 Degrees. Epact...

23 Liinar Cycle...

0 Descending node.

Minutes of arc. 14

h. Hours. Solar Cycle.

8
N. North. S. South.

m. Minutes of time. Roman Indiction.

E. East. W. West. s. Seconds of time. Julian Period

6588
Signs of the Planets.
O The Sun.
Mars.

JANUARY ( The Moon.

24 Jupiter, Mars 3 degrees north of the Moon 6 P.M. Jan, 1.

3 Mercury. h Saturn.

4 P.M.

4. Venus.

or Hi Uranus.
Saturn 4

10 A.M. or The Earth.

Neptune.
Jupiter 3

5 P.M.
2 P.M.

30. Signs of the Zodiac. p Aries.

- Libra. 8 Taurus.

m Scorpio.

The Public Ledger of Philadelphia is, in D Gemini.

f Sagittarius. many respects, the model newspaper of America. 5 Cancer.

Capricornus. It is' faulilessly published in type, matter and Leo.

Aquarius.

manner, and is cdited with conspicuous ability, Virgo.

# Pisces.

Nothing of doubtful propriety is ever admitted Aspects.

to its columns, and its entire influence is for good

only. As a New Yorker there is nothing we cnvy o Conjunction, having the same) Longitude Philadelphia so much for as this admirably conÒ Quadrature, differing 90° in Right As. 8 Opposition, differing 180° in

ducted newspaper.- New York Trade Reporter, cension. Feb. 7, 1874

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THEATRES, CIRCUSES AND MUSIC

1813. July 9. Summer-Theatre opened by HALLS ESTABLISHED IN PHILA

Lawrence Astolfi & Co. at the Columbian GarDELPHIA, 1749-1875.

den-afterward called Tivoli, and then Pavilion

Circus-at the north side of Market street west 1749, August, to February, 1750. First theatrical of Thirteenth. representations by a company of professional ac- 1813. Washington Museum opened in Market tors: Kean and Murray, managers.

street east of Second, south side. 1754, April 25. Lewis Hallam's Company opened 1814, May 11. Vauxhall Garden Theatre opened at William Plumstead's store-house, east side of at the north-east corner of Broad and Walnut Penn (or Water) street between Pine and Lom- streets; burned by a mob September 8. 1819; bard streets; closed June 24 in the same year. rebuilt, and reopened July 5, 1824, by Fisher &

1759, June 15. Society Hill Theatre, South Jones. wark, opened at the corner of South and Vernon 1820, October 24. Winter Tivoli or Prune Street streets by David Douglass; closed December 28, Theatre opened in Prune street between Fifth and and the building afterward demolished.

Sixth, south side, by Stanislas Surin. 1766, November 21. Southwark Theatre opened 1824. Musical Fund Hall, Locust street above by David Douglass; burned May 9, 1821. Eighth, opened with a concert. ,1771. Faulk's temporary Circus opened on

1826, May, 27

Washington Museum Theatre Market strect west of Centre Square.

opened in Market street east of Second, south 1772. Bates'temporary Circus at the same place. side, by Archbold. 1782. P. E. Du Simitiere's “ American Muse- 1826, June 23. Pennsylvania Museum Theatre,

opened at his house in Arch st. ab. Fourth. Market street above Eighth, south side, opened 1784. Peale's Museum opened at south-west by Archbold; abandoned July same year. corner of Third and Lombard streets ; removed 1827. Maelzel's Hall, west side of Fifth street to American Philosophical Hall, South Fifth street, above Prune (site of Lailson's Circus); built for 1794 ; removed to upper part of State House, 1802; Mons. Maelzel, mechanician, artist in automaton removed to Arca north side of Chestnut street figu etc., afterward Titus, June & Ang e's between Sixth and Seventh, 1828 ; removed to Menagerie ; burnt about 1845. north-east corner of Ninth and Sansom streets, 1828, October 1, Arch Street Theatre opened and opened July 4, 1838; collection afterward sold in Arch street west of Sixth, north side, by Wm. out, and a part of it removed tu Masonic Hall. B. Wood; interior torn out and rebuilt; reopened

1785. Permanent Circus building erected by September 12, 1863. Pool, an American equestrian, on Market street 1829. Washington Amphitheatre and Circus, near Centre Square.

Old York road above Buttonwood street, opened 1790. Daniel Bowen's Museum and Wax-work, by Fogg & Stickney. established in Third street below Arch; removed 1834. Sansom Street Circus, Sansom street same year to Eighth street above Market; after above Eighth, south side, opened by Weeks. ward removed to Boston, and was the foundation 1834, October. Northern Exchange Theatre, of the Columbian Museum in that city.

Third street below Green, opened by Jos. Jeffer1791, April 6. Northern Liberty Theatre opened son, Jr. on the east side of Front street below Noble, by 1835: The Hall of Industry opened at FotteKenna.

ral's Hall, north-west corner of Fifth and Chest1793, April 2. Chestnut Street Theatre, Chest- nut streets, afterward American Museum, J. H. nut street west of Sixth, north side, opened by Myers (Old Hontz), manager; burned December, Wignell & Reinagle ; burned April 2, 1820; re- 1854; rebuilt, occupied 1856-9, as Thomeuf's built and opened December 2, 1822 ; torn down Varieties. May, 1855.

1836, November 7: Pennsylvania Theatre, 1793. April 3. Circus building, opened at the Coates street west of Second, north side, opened south-west corner of Twelfth and Market streets by Logan & Weymss. by John Bill Ricketts; abandoned in 1795.

1837, August 28. Cooke's Equestrian Circus-1794. Ambroise & Co. opened the Amphi- afterward Burton's National Theatre, and then theatre, Arch street between Eighth and Ninth, Welch's Amphitheatre-opened by T. Cooke; for the exhibition of French paintings, mechan- burned July 5, 1854. ical effects and fireworks.

1838, July 4. Dunn's Chinese Museum opened 1795, October 19. Pantheon Circus and Amphi. at Philadelphia Museum building at the north-east theatre, south-west corner of Sixth and Chestnut corner of Ninth and Sansom streets; collection streets, opened by John Bill Ricketts; destroyed sold about 1842–3 ; building burned July 5, 1854. by fire December 17, 1799.

1839, November. Assembly Buildings, south1797, April 8.

Lailson's Circus, north-west west corner Tenth and Chestnut streets, opened ; corner of Filth and Prune streets, opened by burned March 18, 1851 : rebuilt, and reopened 1852. Mons. Lailson; destroyed by the falling in of the 1840, June 13 McAran's Garden Theatre, dome July 8, 1798.

Filbert street between Seventeenth and Eigh1797. Federal Summer-Circus opened by Her- teenth, opened by Ward & McIntosh. man, Tompkins and others at the corner of Thir- 1845, December 25. Athenæum Museum and teenth and Market streets.

Theatre-afterward Barnum's Museum-south180g, February 2. Circus-afterward called east corner Seventh and Chestnut streets, opened The Olympic, and then Walnut Street Theatre; by Taber & Co.; burned December 30, 1851. north-east corner of Walnut and Ninth streets 1846, August. Academy of Fine Arts or Peale's opened by Pepin & Breschard, equestrians; re- Museum Theatre, Masonic Hall, Chestnut Street built, and opened by Inslee & Blake Jan. 1, 1829. between Seventh and Eighth, opened by John

1811, June 12. Apollo Street Theatre, Apollo Sefton & Co.; closed July, 1847. street south of the old Southwark Theatre, opened 1848. Sansom Street Hall opened for concerts, by Webster, Cross and others; abandoned July 19. balls, etc.; closed for such purposes 1863.

Second Month,]

FEBRUARY.

(1875.

Day of the Year.
Day of the Month.
Day of the Week.

MOON'S PHASES, Philadelphia.
d. h. m.

d. h. m.
New Moon... 6 2 57 A.M. O Full Moon... 20

3 3 A.M.
) First Quarter 13
O 22 A.M. (Last Quarter 28

4 53 A.M.

PHENOMENA.

33 2 Tu 34 3 W

6 28 6 59 5.7

36 5 F 37 6 S

3 56

6 11

43 12 F 44:13 S

8 50

48 17 W

51 20 S 52 21 S

8 15

8 27 17

57 26 F

6 39 13

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THE SUN, THE MOON,

THE TIDES,
Philadelphia. Philadelphia.

Philadelphia.
Rises Souths Sots Rises. Souths Sets.

& High Tide.
Low Tide.

(Per., tod, roh, P.M. A.M. P.M. P.M. P.M. A.M. P.M.

A.M. P.M. A.M

P.M. (Apo., 26d. 7h. A.M. ... ... . . . . . . d. h. m. h. m. h. m. h. m. S 32 IM 7 10 13 52 5 18 3 38! 8 9 040 25 9 33 10 6 4 22 4 52 5.3 2.17 P.M. I gr.hel.lat.N. 7 9:14 0 5 19 4 39 9 2

1 26 26 10 36 11

9 5 25

5 55 5.4 5.15 A.M. 8 HO.E.
7
8 14 6 5 20

5 34 9 58
2 21 27 11 40

4.06 A.M. Prises. 35 4 Th 7 7 14 12 5 22 6 23 10 53 3 24 28 O 9

0 36 7 28 7 55 5.9 8.08 P.M. Capella N. 7

6 14 17 5 23 7 311 48 4 33 010 59 1 22 8 18 8 41 6.1 4.46 P.M. Oh O. 7 5 14 21 5 24 7 37

0 41 5 44

1 45

28 9 4 9 27 6.3 0.11 A.M. Ó hc. 38 S 7 4 14 25 5 25 8 6

I 31 6 56 1 2 31 2 52 950 10 11 6.5 || 6.33 A.M. Ooo. 39 8 M 7 ? 14 27 5 26 8 32 2 19 8 7 2 3 14 3 35 10 33 10 54 6.5 1.36 A.M. rises. 40 9 Tu 3 1 14 29 5 28 8 56 3 7 9 17 3

4 17 11 15 11 36 6.5 8.57 P.M. & in 2. 41 10 W

0 14 30 5 29 9 19 3 55 10 30 41 4 39 5 1 11 58 6.4 11.11 P.M. 2 rises. 42 11 Th 6 59 14 30 5 30 9 45 4 45 11 45 5 5 24 5 47

O 20 0 43 6.3 6.13 A.M. ÓWC. (W. 6 58 14 30 5 31 10 15 5 38 A.M. 6

6 37 I 6 1 30 6.0 7.01 P.M. S. ab. 105. of 6 56 14 28 5 32 10 50 6 34 1 1

7 7 6 7 37

I56 2 25 5.8 8.22 P.M. gr. elong E. 6 55 14 26 5 34 11 34 7 34 2 19 8 12

2 56 3 31 5.5 10.51 A.M. 0 in Per. 46 15 M 6 54 14 23 5 35 0 28 8 35 3 34 9

9 28 10 4 4 91 4 47 5.3 7.... A.M. 2 sta. A. 47 16 Tu 6 53 14 20 5 36 1 319 36 4 43 10 10 40 11 16 5 23 5 595.5 4.09 A.M. nses. 6 51 14 16 5 37 2 41 10 33 5 40 1 11 46

6 35 7 5/5.7 7.17 P.M. Capella N. 49 18 Th 6 50 14 10 5 38 3 52 11 26 6 24 12 O 16 O 41 7 35 8 0 6.0 3.37 A.M. I gr. elong W. 50 19 F 6 49 14 5 5 39 3 A.M.

6 59 13 1 4 I 24 8 23 8 43 6.2 8.41 P.M. Sir, south. 6 48 13 58 5 41

6 8
0 141 7 26 14 I 45 2 51 9 4 9 24 6.3

6 4.... P.M. Ostat. 6 46 13 51 5 42 7 15 o 59 7 46 15 2 25 2 43 9 44 10 26.4 5.34 P.M. 7* south. 53 22 M 6 45 13 44 5 43

1 14
8 8 16

3 2 3 20 10 21 10 39 6.5 6.19 P.M. Ald. S. 54 23 Tu 6 43 13 35 5 44 9 18 2 21

3 37 3 55 10 56 11 14 6.5 10.10 P.M. 2 rises. 55 24 W 6 42 13 26 5 45 10 19 3 2 8 47 18

4 13 4 32 11 32 11 51 6.5 6.24 P.M. & gr bol. lat.N. 56 25 Th 6 40 13 17 5 46 11 20 3 43 9 8 19

4 SI 5 11

O 10 6.4 2.02 A, M. Ở 2 (. 75 48 A.M. 4 26 9 32 20 5 30 5 50 O 30 049 6.3

9:57 A.M. OO. 58 27 S 6 38 13 565 49

5 II 10
6 II 6 34 19

11.10 P.M. Pollux s. 6 36 13 4515 500 25 5 59 10 34 22 6 59 7 25 1 53) 2 I8 5.8 || 4.36 A.M. Ở đ (. Fixed and Movable Feasts, Fasts, etc., 1875. The second Eclipse is an Annular Eclipse, beEpiphany..

Jan.

6 ginning at 5 A.M., September 29th, Philadelphia Shrove Tuesday.

time, in the Atlantic Ocean, and ending about a Ash Wednesday..

A.M. in the eastern part of Africa. The Sun will

IO Valentine's Day..

rise partly eclipsed and will be visible throughout

14 St. Patrick's Day.

the United States east of the Mississippi River, Palm Sunday

being nearly central at sunrise in Philadelphia. Maundy Thursday

25 Good Friday

26 Easter Sunday .......

28

FEBRUARY Whitsunday

May 16 Trinity Sunday.

Venus 9 degrees north of the Moon 8 A.M. Feb. 1.

9

23 St. John the Baptist's Day

Saturn 4

O A.M. 6. June 24 All Saints' Day.... Nov.

2 A.M. Jupiter 3

25. 1 All Souls' Day..

5 A.M. 28.

2 Advent Sunday

28 Christmas Day St. John the Evangelist's Day......

It is not every one who can successfully com27

bine the useful with the ornamental, but in the ECLIPSES IN 1875.

Ledger Almanac, which now, for the third suc

Cessive year, Mr. Childs presents to his friends In the year 1875 there will be two Eclipses, both and subscribers, beauty and utility are blended in of the Sun. One of these will be partly visible equal proportions. The covers are attractive as in Philadelphia, September 29, 1875.

artistic creations, while the contents are made up The first Eclipse of the year is a Total Eclipse, of information frequently needed, but which, beginning at i P.M., April 5th, Philadelphia without the Almanac, could be obtained only at time, in the southern portion of Africa, and end- the cost of much time and trouble. It is a book ing about 4 A.M., on the 6th of April, in the Pa. which will be hung up in the counting-room and citic Ocean north of Australia. This Eclipse will be visible throughout the Indian Ocean and

the private dwelling, and, like the Public Ledger

itself, will be referred to from day to day throughin the southern part of China.

out the entire year.-Philadelphia Age.

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1849, January. American Circus, Fourth street Arch street west of Tenth, opened by Simmons between Brown and Poplar, opened by T, V. & Slocum; burned March 20, 1872; revpened Turner & Co.

August 26, 1872. 1852. Melodeon, afterward Wood's Museum, 1870, November 23. American Museum, Mena. opened in old Bolivar Hotel building, Chestnut gerie and Theatre-afterward Wood's Museumstreet between Sixth and Seventh, north side; north-west corner Ninth and Arch streets, opened opened as Wood's Museum by Col. J. H. Wood, by Simpson, Carncross & Dixey. 1854, December 17; burned 1857.

1870, December 17. Fox's New American 1853, February 12: Concert Hall, Chestnut Theatre, Chestnut street between Tenth and street between Twelfth and Thirteenth, opened Eleventh, north side, opened by Robert Fox. with a concert by Mad. Sontag and others.

1870. Harmonie Hall(Germán theatre), Coates 1853, August 1. Sanford's Opera House, street near Seventh, opened by Mænnerchur MuTwelfth street below Chestnut, opened by Sam'í sical Society; burned March 8, 1871. S. Sanford; burned December 9, 1853.

1871. Sanford's Opera House, Second street 1853, December 3. Circus--formerly Mena. above Poplar, opened by S. S. Sanford; burned gerie, afterward Welch & Raymond's Circus, and October 17, 1871. then Continental Theatre-Walnut street west of Eighth, opened by Ballard & Stickney; burned

THE PUBLIC LEDGER. June 19. 1867: rebuilt 1867.

1854, September 11. City Museum Theatre, There is one daily paper familiar as a houseCallowhill street between "Fourth and Filth, hold word to Philadelphians, and to all reading opened by Ashton & Co.; burned November 25, people everywhere, which has won, and now 1868.

holds more firinly than ever, both the love and 1854, December 4. Lyceum-afterward San- respect of all its readers. We refer, of course, to ford's, and then Eleventh Street Opera House, the Public Ledger, the exponent of all the news east side of Eleventh street above Chestnut, of the day that is true; of the culture of educated opened by H. S. Cartee.

practical thought in its editorial columns; and of 1856, January 8. National Hall, Market street a morality that is as pure as it is imperceptible, between Twelfth and Thirteenth, south side, because it is inwoven into every department of opened with a concert by the Musical Union; the paper. Sensationalism in all of its forms, and opened as a circus by Gardner & Hemmings, realistic gilded reports of the crimes of society, November 2, 1862 ; called the Olympic Theatre, are to be looked for elsewhere; for Mr. George and opened by J. H. Johnson & Co., October 21, W. Childs, who made the Ledger what it is, and 1873: burned January 29, 1874.

keeps it so by his unflagging supervision, feels 1856, December 23. Jayne's Hall, north side too keenly the responsibility of a popular journalof Chestnut street near Seventh, opened with a ist, and has too intuitive and unerring a sense of

right and wrong, to willingly lead others astray 1857, February 25. American Academy of in thought or deed by means of his printed sheets. Music, corner Broad and Locust streets, opened Evil words and actions have a sort of immortality by E. A. Marshall, with Italian Opera; first given them when they are pictured in prini. opened with a ball, January 26; corner-stone laid Many a criminal derives his first lessons in crime July 25, 1835.

from the public newspaper, but never from the 1857, November 17. National Guards' Hall, Public Ledger. The nearly ninety thousand Race street between Fitih and Sixth, opened copies which are scattered every morning over with a ball and promenade concert.

city and town, village and hamlet, and the country 1859, January 19. McDonough's Gayeties, at large, contain no word or thought that can Race street between Second and Third, opened taint the morals or the life. We came by our by J. E. McDonough; opened as McDonough's admiration of the Ledger naturally: we inherited Olympic Theatre September 10, 1860.

it. There are some newspapers which are truly 1859, November 21. Theatre of Art, etc., family papers--the father takes them, and his Jayne's Commonwealth Building, north side of sons and daughters take them, because their Chestnut street between Sixth and Seventh, father did. We have no doubt that the Ledger's opered by J. Sanderson; now used for business list of subscribers is more permanent than perhaps purposes.

that of any other paper in the world. Those who 1863. January 26. New Chestnut Street The- once take it always take it, they and their chilatre, Chestnut street between Twelfth and Thir- dren. Any number of persons can be persuaded teenth, north side, opened by Wm. Wheatley; to take almost any newspaper for a single day or interior rebuilt 1874.

week, whatever its merits or demerits may be ; 1865, November 27. Philadelphia Circus and but in order to make them permanent subscribers, Menagerie -- afterward Mortimer's Varieties - there must be in it and its conductor a reputation south-west corner Tenth and Callowhill streets, for honesty of purpose, energy of will, business opened by Adam Forepaugh.

enterprise and a determination to give the latest 1865. Amateurs' Drawing-Room, Seventeenth and all the news. We have just risen again from street above Chestnut, west side, opened by a a careful consideration of all of the columns of private amateur company:

the Public Ledger, including those of its supple1867, May 29. Horticultural Hall, Broad street ments, now regularly issued twice a week, and above Spruce, opened with a floral exhibition. are, if possible, more fully convinced than ever

1867, September 18. Philadelphia Opera House before that its news columns were never so full -afterward Seventh Street Opera House-Sev- of the life of to-day; its advertising columns were enth street below Arch, opened by Tunison & never so well patronized or so valuable to the Parsons; afterward called Philadelphia Opera general reader; and that it is without a peer in Comique; afterward Adelphi Variety.

daily newspaper journalism.- The Episcopal Reg. 1870, August 20. Arch Street Opera House, ister, Philadelphia, June 14.

concert.

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Third Month,)

MARCH.

(1875.

. m.

MOON'S PHASES, Philadelphia.
d. h. m.

d.
New Moon...

7
3 22 P.M.

O Full Moon... 21 6 54 P.M.
D First Quarter 14

8

8 A.M. Last Quarter 29 11 27 P.m.

Day of the Year, | Day of the Month.

Day of the Week.

PHENOMENA,

Height in fut.

P.M.

6 33 5.7

4 33 28

5 38 9

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71 12F 72 13 S 73 145 74 15 M

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6 58 7 31

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THE SUN, THE MOON,

THE TIDES,
Philadelphia Philadelphia

Philadelphia.
Rises Soutbs Sets Rises. Souths Sets. High Tide. Low Tide.

(Per., rod. 2h. A.M. A.M.P.M. P.M.A.M.A.M. A.M.

A.M. P.M.

A.M. h.m.m. s.h.m. h. m. h. m. h. m. d. A. m. h. m. h. m. h. mu.

(Apo., 26d. ih. A.M. 60 IM 6 34 12 33 5 51 2 27 6 51 11 15 23 7 57 8 30 2 44 3 16 5.6 3.5 P.M. Ở Ý G. 61 2 Tu 6 33 12 21 5 52

3 23 7 44 O 624 9 5 9 38 3 49 4 24 5.3 4 13 A.M. ! ris, o. 62 3 W

6 31 12 95 53 4 16 8 39 I 3 25 10 10 10 42 4 571 5 29 5.4 9.49 P.M. Ó C. 63 4 Th 6 30 11 55 5 54 4 571 9 34

2 1126 11 14 11 43

6
1

7.50 P.M. Sir. S. 64 5 F 6 28 11 42 5 55

5 34 10 28
3 22 27

O II

7 2 7 30 5.8 3.34 P.M. Oh (. 65 6S 6 27 11 28 5 56 6 5 11 19

O 35 O 581 7 54 8 17 6.1 4.27 P.M. Ó SO. 66 7 8 6 25 11 14 5 57 6 32 o 9 5 46 0 1 19 41

o 6.2

0.59 A.M. d rises, 671 8 M 6 24 10 59 59 6 57 o 58 7 00 1 2 1 2 24 9 20 9 43 6.4 0.07 A.M. 7 * set. 68 9 Tu 6 22 10 44 7 21 1 48 8 14 245

3 8 10

4.10 27 6.5 8.43 P.M. Spi, rises. 69 10 W 6 21 10 28 6 7 47

2 389 30 3 3 29 3 53 10 48 11 12 6.5 2.31 P.M. Ó W. 72,11 Th 6 19 10 12 2 8 16 3 32 10 48 4 16 4 40 11 35 11 59 6.5 8.20 P.M. Pollux S. 6 17 9 56 8 50 4 29 A.M. 5l 5 6 5 33

o 25 6.4 9.08 P.M. 4 rises. 4 9 31 5 28 8! 6 6 0 6 28

0 52 1 19 6.1 | 10.36 P.M. Reg. S. 6 14 9 23 6 5 10 22 6 30

147 2 17 5.8 5.- A.M. h rises. 6 6 6 11 241 7 30 2 37 8

8 8 8 45 2 501 3275-5 1.- A.M. stat. A. 75 16 Tu6 u

7
O 31 8 28

3 37 9 9 21 9 56 4 4 4 405-3 4.13 A.M. | rises, 26 17 W 6 0 8

31

1 42 9 21 4 24 10 10 27 10 59 5 15 5 46 5.5 6, P.M. H . 77 18 Th 6 8 8 13 9 2 51 10 11 5 11 11 26 11 52 6 18 6 45 5.7 6.55 P.M. Sirius S. 78 19 F 6 6 7 56 3 58 10 55 5 29 12

o 16 7 II

7 35 5.9 11.19 P.M. 7* set. 6 4 7 39

II

5 3 11 38 5 53 13 0 38 o 56 7 57 8 15 6.1 7.20 P.M. Sp. begins 80 21 S 6

3 7 19
6 12 6 5 A.M.
1 14 I 30 8 33 8

7.36 P.M. Procy. S. 81 22 M 16

7 16 13 7

6
019

6
32 15

7 9 8 9 26 6.3 10.01 P.M. Reg. S. 82 23 Tu 6 6

43
6 14 8 7 O 59

6
52 16 2 25 2 42 9 44,10

1 6.4 7:33 P.M. Pollux S. 83.24 W 5 58 6 24 6 15 8

139 7 12 17 3 0 3 19 TO 19 10 38 6.5 5:49 A.M. Ø 4 (. 84 25 Th 5 56 6 6 6 16 10 II 2 21

3 37 3 57 10 56 11 16 6.5 8.11 P.M. 27 rises. 85 26 F

5 55 5 47 6 17 IL 13 3 6 8 I 19 4 16 4 37 11 35 11 56 6.5 7.36 P.M. Spi, rises, 86 27 S 5 53 5 29 6 18 A.M. 3 53 8 32 20

4 59

018 6.4

2.07 A.M. P h. 5 52 5 10 6 19 O 15 4.42 99 21

5 44 6 8

O 40 I 36.2 2.17 P.M. odc. 88 29 M 5 50 4 52 6 20 I 12 5 34 9 57 22

7 o I 27 1 52 5.9 .01 A.M. O gr. elg.W. 89 30 Tu 5 48 4 33 6 21 2 6 6 28 10 50 23

8

2 19 2 47 5.7 4.53 A.M. r. abi. 11° S. 90 31 W 5 47 4 15 6 22 2 511 7 22 11 52 2411 8 359 91 3 20 3 54 5.4 113.58 A.M. h ris. [of B. MARCH.

on the 28th of September, visible for two or three Venus 7 deg. north of the Moon 10 P.M. Mar. 3.

months before and after that date. 7 Saturn 4

To facilitate the finding and identifying the 4 P.M.

5 Jupiter 3

6 AM

Planets, the dates when they are nearest the

24. 2 P.M. " 28.

Moon and the distance at which they pass above or below, in degrces, are given on each page of

the Ephemeris. It will be remembered ihat the PLANETS.

Moon itself is about half a degree in diameter. Mercury () will be at its greatest western elongation March 29, July 27 and Nov. 15, and its greatest castern elongation Feb. 13, June 9 The Public Ledger Almanac for 1874, supplied and Oct. 6. If the sky is favorable, the planet can by Mr. George W. Childs to every one of his probably be seen in the evening about the time eighty or ninety thousand subscribers, appears of the first three dates, and in the morning about as usual in handsome but most compact shape, the time of the last three dates.

with all its vast array of facts and statistics VENUS ( 9 ) will be morning star until the 23d marshaled with true Ledger-like brevity and of September, being most brilliant about the

solidity. The Ledger, by its steady, substantial middle of January. After the 23d of September progress amid the fluctuations of Philadelphia it becomes evening star for the rest of the year. journalism, demonstrates the encouraging fact

Mars (d) will be visible during the latter half that the highest success can be won in journal. of the year, rising about 9 P.M. on the 3d of June ism without resort to sensational piquancies or and on the meridian about the 27th of July at the truculent abuse of everybody and everything. same hour.

The circulation of the Ledger on Saturday, FebJUPITER (21) will be on the meridian at 9 P.M. on the 28th of May, and visible two or three five hundred--probably the largest bona fide cir.

ruary 7th, had reached eighty-seven thousand months before and after that date.

culation of any paper in the world.-Washington SATURN (h) will be on the meridian at 9 P.M. Evening Star, February uth.

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