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" The Inhabitants of this Country are the miserablest People in the world. The Hodmadods of Monomatapa, though a nasty people, yet for Wealth are Gentlemen to these... "
Inventing Australia: Images and Identity, 1688-1980
by Richard White - 1981 - 216 pages
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Voyages of Discovery: Captain Cook and the Exploration of the Pacific

Lynne Withey - History - 1989 - 512 pages
...described the native men as black, much like Africans in physical features, and exceedingly primitive; "the Inhabitants of this Country are the miserablest People in the world," he had written. Dampier's account had made such an impression on him and on others in the ship, Banks...
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Hawke's Law: The Politics of Mining and Aboriginal Land Rights in Australia

Ronald T. Libby - History - 2003 - 208 pages
...described in "one of the minor classics of racism" the Aboriginals that he observed in these terms: The inhabitants of this country are the miserablest people in the World ihey differ little from Brutes. They are tall, strait bodied, and thin, with long limbs. They have...
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Implicit Understandings: Observing, Reporting and Reflecting on the ...

Stuart B. Schwartz, Schwartz Stuart B. - History - 1994 - 637 pages
...of the social organization, but Dampier's sweeping generalization is the focus of most commentaries: "The inhabitants of this country are the miserablest People in the World. The Hodmadoda of Monomatapa, though a nasty People yet for Wealth are Gentlemen to these . . . setting...
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Dispossession: Black Australians and white invaders

Henry Reynolds - History - 1996 - 240 pages
...century later. W. DAMPIER, A NEW VOYAGE ROUND THE WORLD, THE ARGONAUT PRESS, LONDON, 1927, PP. 312-13. The Inhabitants of this Country are the miserablest People in the World. . . [They] have no Houses, and skin Garments, Sheep, Poultry, and Fruits of the Earth . . . and setting...
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Speaking Out of Turn: Lectures and Speeches, 1940-1991

Charles Manning Hope Clark, Manning Clark - Language Arts & Disciplines - 1997 - 263 pages
...them, they were astonished by three things: 1 . Their material misery, as noted by William Dampier: The Hodmadods of Monomatapa, though a nasty people,...Skin Garments, Sheep, Poultry and Fruits of the Earth . . . etc., as the Hodmadods have; and setting aside their humane shape, they differ but little from...
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Landprints: Reflections on Place and Landscape

George Seddon - Architecture - 1998 - 290 pages
...31 not the least. Dampier did not think much of them, and said so in an oft-quoted, dismissive text: The inhabitants of this Country are the miserablest People in the world. The Hodmadods [Hottentots] of Monomatapa, though a nasty People, yet for Wealth are Gentlemen to these; who have...
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The Great South Sea: English Voyages and Encounters, 1570-1750

Glyndwr Williams - History - 1997 - 320 pages
...New Voyage was to live long in the European memory. Naked, black, without covering or habitations, The Inhabitants of this Country are the miserablest People in the World . . . setting aside their Humane Shape, they differ but httle from Brutes. They are tall, strait-bodied,...
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History of Physical Anthropology, Volume 2

Department of Anthropology Queens College Frank Spencer, Frank Spencer - Physical anthropology - 1997 - 1195 pages
...thought to be inextricably linked. For example, William Dampier (1652-1715) noted of Australia that "the inhabitants of this Country are the miserablest People in the world. . . . [S]etting aside their human shape, they differ but little from Brutes" (1697:263). The few histories...
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Seeking the Centre: The Australian Desert in Literature, Art and Film

Roslynn Doris Haynes - Biography & Autobiography - 1998 - 347 pages
...William Dampier in 1697: 'The Inhabitants of this country are the miserablest People in the World . . . who have no Houses and skin Garments, Sheep, Poultry and Fruits of the Earth. . . . They differ but litde from Brutes.'42 Moreover, the rise of evangelicalism and European missionary...
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Asia in the Making of Europe, Volume III: A Century of Advance. Book 3 ...

Donald F. Lach, Edwin J. Van Kley - History - 1998 - 577 pages
...the earlier Dutch accounts. They are, he concludes, The miserablest People in the World . . . They have no Houses, and skin Garments, Sheep, Poultry, and Fruits of the Earth . . . And setting aside their Humane shape, they differ little from Brutes. They are tall, strait-bodied,...
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