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" The public roads were accurately divided by milestones, and ran in a direct line from one city to another, with very little respect for the obstacles either of nature or private property. Mountains were perforated, and bold arches thrown over the broadest... "
The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire - Page 57
by Edward Gibbon - 1816
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In the Shadow of Cairngorm: Chronicles of the United Parishes of Abernethy ...

William Forsyth - Abernethy and Kincardine (Scotland : Parish) - 1900 - 447 pages
...pervaded the provinces, and were terminated only by the frontiers of the Empire." Gibbon says : — " The public roads were accurately divided by milestones,...one city to another, with very little respect for obstacles, either of nature, or of private propeity." ..." They united the subjects of the most distant...
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The Gentleman's Magazine, Volume 292

English periodicals - 1902
...north-west to the J. south-east point of the Empire was drawn out to the length Of 4080 Roman miles. The public roads were accurately divided by milestones,...the obstacles either of nature or private property. . . . The middle part of the road was raised into a terrace, which commanded the adjacent country,...
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The Journal of Political Economy, Volume 11

Economics - 1903
...remotest parts with the center. Neither mountains nor streams were permitted to separate city and city. Mountains were perforated and bold arches thrown over the broadest and most rapid streams. The solid construction of the Roman highways has not entirely yielded to the effort of fifteen...
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Our Roman highways

Urquhart Atwell Forbes, Arnold C. Burmester - Great Britain - 1904 - 259 pages
...Pearson's ' Historical Maps,' Essay I., p. 4. t ' Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire/ vol. i., p. 61. to another, with very little respect for the obstacles either of Nature or private property.' To insure the straight course of the latter, huge marshes, as has been said, were drained, rapid rivers...
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The Works of Edward Gibbon, Volume 1

Edward Gibbon - Byzantine Empire - 1906
...Mamelukes, Syria was supposed to contain sixty thousand villages (Histoire de Timur Bee, 1. vc 20). roads were accurately divided by milestones, and ran...bold arches thrown over the broadest and most rapid streams.90 The middle part of the road was raised into a terrace which commanded the adjacent country,...
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Text-book of School and Class Management: Theory and practice

Felix Arnold - School management and organization - 1908
...were 4080 Roman miles of roads. The public roads were accurately divided by mile-stones and ran in direct line from one city to another, with very little...bold arches thrown over the broadest and most rapid streams. The middle part of the road was raised into a terrace which commanded the adjacent country,...
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King's College Lectures on Colonial Problems

Fossey John Cobb Hearnshaw - Commonwealth countries - 1913 - 252 pages
...noted that the Canadian Pacific railway from Montreal to Vancouver covers 2900 miles. Gibbon continues, "Mountains were perforated and bold arches thrown over the broadest and most rapid streams " ; and of the Roman posts he writes, " By the help of these relays it was easy to travel an...
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Heracles' Bow: Essays on the Rhetoric and Poetics of the Law

James Boyd White - Law - 1989 - 272 pages
...south-east point of the empire, was drawn out to the length of four thousand and eighty Roman miles. The public roads were accurately divided by milestones,...bold arches thrown over the broadest and most rapid streams. The middle part of the road was raised into a terrace which commanded the adjacent country,...
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The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire: 28 Selected Chapters

Edward Gibbon - Fiction - 1998 - 1089 pages
...south-east point of the empire, was drawn out to the length of four thousand and eighty Roman miles.85 The public roads were accurately divided by milestones,...most rapid streams.86 The middle part of the road was raised into a terrace which commanded the adjacent country, consisted of several strata of sand,...
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The Quarterly Christian Spectator

Theology - 1829
...south-east point of the empire, was drawn out to the length of four thousand and eighty Roman miles. The public roads were accurately divided by mile-stones,...or private property. Mountains were perforated, and arches thrown over the broadest and most rapid streams. The middle part of the road was raised into...
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