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" I'll ne'er bear a base mind: — an't be my destiny, so; an't be not, so: No man's too good to serve his prince ; and, let it go which way it will, he that dies this year, is quit for the next. "
Shakspeare's Dramatic Works: With Explanatory Notes - Page 157
by William Shakespeare, Samuel Ayscough - 1790
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Along with Youth: Hemingway, the Early Years

Peter Griffin - History - 1987 - 274 pages
...Dorman-Smith seemed erudite and wise until, one day, he quoted a passage from Henry IV, Part 2—"By my troth, I care not; a man can die but once; we owe God a death ... he that dies this year is quit for the next"—spoken in the play by Frances Feeble, a feckless recruit "as valiant as a wrathful dove or...
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New Critical Approaches to the Short Stories of Ernest Hemingway

Paul Smith - Literary Criticism - 1990 - 512 pages
...includes no less than three instances in the former citing the lines from Shakespeare — "By my troth, I care not; a man can die but once; we owe God a death" — a line so talismanic for Hemingway, Robert Wilson, and for many Hemingway scholars. The line from...
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Hemingway's Quarrel with Androgyny

Mark Spilka - Literary Criticism - 1990 - 383 pages
...British guide replies: "That's it. ... Worst one can do is kill you. How does it go? . . . 'By my troth, I care not; a man can die but once; we owe God a death and let it go which way it will he that dies this year is quit for the next.' " As Hemingway must have...
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Pagan Virtue: An Essay in Ethics

John Casey, John Peter Anthony Casey - Philosophy - 1991 - 242 pages
...warriors to buy themselves off. They all do, until he encounters Feeble, a tailor): FEEBLE. By my troth I care not, a man can die but once, we owe God a death. I'll ne'er bear a base mind — and't be my destiny, so; and't be not, s0. No man's too good to serve's...
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Walks In Hemingway's Paris: A Guide To Paris For The Literary Traveler

Noel R. Fitch - Biography & Autobiography - 1992 - 208 pages
...special fondness for the words of Feeble wasted upon Falstaff in Henry the Fourth: Part Two: 'By my troth I care not, a man can die but once, we owe God a death. . . . An't be my destiny. The homes on the quais of He Saint-Louis, now some of the most costly land...
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The Meaning of Life: Insights of the World's Great Thinkers

William Gerber - Philosophy - 1994 - 282 pages
...King Henry IV, commented as follows on the chance of his being killed in battle: (553) By my troth, I care not; a man can die but once: we owe God a death; . . . and let it go which way it will, he that dies this year is quit for the next. With regard to...
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Four Histories

William Shakespeare - Literary Criticism - 1994 - 865 pages
...1 the only in Tudor times (Harry is Henry 3 that Bardolph offers Falstaff at FEEBLE By my troth, I care not; a man can die but once; we owe God a death. I'll ne'er bear a base mind. An't. be my destiny, so; an't be not, so. No man's too good 230 to serve's...
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Approach to Shakespeare

Gilian West - Education - 2015 - 104 pages
...and she is old, and cannot help herself. You shall have forty, sir. Go to; stand aside. By my troth, I care not; a man can die but once; we owe God a death. I'll ne'er bear a base mind. An't be my destiny, so; an't be not, so. No man's too good to serve's...
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Fictional Death and the Modernist Enterprise

Alan Warren Friedman - Literary Criticism - 1995 - 339 pages
...reveal something about himself. He quotes the Shakespearean line that expresses his credo: "By my troth, I care not; a man can die but once; we owe God a death and let it go which way it will he that dies this year is quit for the next." But immediately he regrets...
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The Complete Works of William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare - Drama - 1996 - 1263 pages
...cannot help herself: you shall have forty, sir. BARDOLPH. Go to; stand aside. FEEBLE. By my troth, ate. I'll ne'er bear a base mind: an't be my destiny, so; an't be not, so: no man's too good to serve's...
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