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" ... a statute made upon great consideration, introduced in a solemn and pompous manner, has had no other effect than to add at most three words to a conveyance. "
The Parliamentary Debates - Page 185
by Great Britain. Parliament - 1828
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The Theory and Practice of Conveyancing: With Precedents : an Analytical ...

James Lord - Conveyancing - 1844 - 210 pages
...affected. To tail the reason of mankind assented, and it has stood on this footing ever since, and by this means a statute, made upon great consideration,...than to add at most three words to a conveyance.* Thus, the strict construction which the Judges put upon that statute, in a great measure defeated its...
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The Law Review and Quarterly Journal of British and Foreign ..., Volume 1

International law - 1845
...are simply stating the well-known fact, which we may give in Lord Hardwick's 3 emphatic words, that " a statute made upon great consideration, introduced...than to add at most three words to a conveyance," which, although untrue in the result, is perfectly correct as applicable to the effect of the holding...
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An Essay on the Learning of Contingent Remainders and Executory ..., Volume 1

Charles Fearne, Charles Butler - Executory interests - 1845
...been eluded; and such is the whole law of trusts, by which, to use Lord Hardwicke's words, 1 Atk. 591, "a statute made upon great consideration, introduced in a solemn and pompous manner, has had no other effect than to add three words to a conveyance." V. 18. (t) The Court of Chancery,...
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A New Abridgment of the Law with Large Additions and Corrections, Volume 10

Matthew Bacon, Sir Henry Gwilliam, Charles Edward Dodd - Law - 1846
...observed, " A statute made upon great consideration, and introduced in the most solemn manner, by a strict construction, has had no other effect than to add at most three words to a conveyance." Courts of equity have, however, in the exercise of this jurisdiction, wisely avoided, in a great degree,...
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Commentaries on American Law, Volume 4

James Kent - Law - 1848
...said, in the course of his opinion, in Hopkins r. Hopkins. (1 AtI;. Rep. 591,) that the statute of uses had no other effect than to add, at most, three words to a conveyance. This was rather too strongly expressed ; but I presume the abolition of uses with us will not have...
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Practical Conveyancing: A Selection of Forms of General Utili Ty, with Notes ...

Benjamin Lynde Oliver - Conveyancing - 1853 - 622 pages
...speculation, and notwithstanding the declaration of Lord Hardwicke, in Daoenfort v. O/oys,(2) that it has had no other effect than to add at most, three words to a conveyance, it altered the whole system of real transfers. This statute was soon followed by the Statute of Enrol!mcnts,(3)...
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The First Part of the Institutes of the Laws of England: Or, A Commentary ...

Sir Edward Coke - Land tenure - 1853
...Atk. 591), a statute, made upon great consideration, and introduced in a solemn and pompous manner, has had no other effect than to add, at most, three words to a conveyance. Besides, this,—one of the chief inconveniences produced by trusts, was, the secret method they afforded...
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Institutes of American Law, Volume 2

John Bouvier - Law - 1854
...(a) This statute, thus made upon great consideration, and introduced in the most solemn manner, by a strict construction, has had no other effect than to add at most three words to a conveyance. In the exercise of this jurisdiction, courts of equity have in a great degree, wisely avoided those...
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A Selection of Leading Cases on Real Property, Conveyancing, and the ...

Owen Davies Tudor - Conveyancing - 1856 - 887 pages
...existed before the statute, was again introduced. And " by this means," Lord Hardwicke has observed, " a statute made upon great consideration, introduced...at most, three words to a conveyance." 1 Atk. 591. Lord Hardwicke's observation, if confined merely to the intention of the framers of the act to suppress...
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Juridical Tracts, Part 1

Abraham Hayward - Criminal law - 1856 - 95 pages
...assertion, that "a statute, made upon great consideration and introduced in a solemn and pompous manner, has had no other effect than to add, at most, three words to a conveyance ;"— an assertion which has since obtained a sort of prescriptive authority ; the sceptical merely...
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