Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Books Books
" ... a statute made upon great consideration, introduced in a solemn and pompous manner, has had no other effect than to add at most three words to a conveyance. "
The Parliamentary Debates - Page 185
by Great Britain. Parliament - 1828
Full view - About this book

Select Essays in Anglo-American Legal History, Volume 2

Association of American Law Schools - Law - 1908
...•Digby, Prop., 2 ed., 291. 1 Cornish, Uses, 41, 42. •Sugden, Gilbert, Uses, 347, n. 1. pompous manner, has had no other effect than to add at most three words to a conveyance." l This common opinion finds, nevertheless, no support in the old books. On the contrary, they show...
Full view - About this book

The Real Property Law of the State of New York: Being Chapter Fifty of the ...

Robert Ludlow Fowler - Real property - 1909 - 1382 pages
...criticism. Thus, Lord Hardwicke said, in substance, " that a statute made upon great consideration * * * has had no other effect than to add, at most, three words to a conveyance."88 This statement, however, is true of one class of limitations only. The Statute of Uses...
Full view - About this book

Lectures on Legal History and Miscellaneous Legal Essays

James Barr Ames - Droit - 1913 - 553 pages
...the chancellor at once corrected the error of the judges by supporting the second use as a trust; and "by this means a statute made upon great consideration, introduced in a solemn and pompous manner, has had no other effect than to add at most three words to a conveyance." 8 This common opinion finds,...
Full view - About this book

Handbook of the Law of Real Property

William Livesey Burdick - Real property - 1914 - 997 pages
...the effect of the statute was to add a second use.4* This result caused a lord chancellor45 to say: "A statute made upon great consideration, introduced in a solemn and pompous manner, by a strict construction, has had no effect than to add at most three words to a conveyance." The statute...
Full view - About this book

Handbook of the Law of Real Property

William Livesey Burdick - Real property - 1914 - 997 pages
...the effect of the statute was to add a second use.44 This result caused a lord chancellor45 to say: "A statute made upon great consideration, introduced in a solemn and pompous manner, by a strict construction, has had no effect than to add at most three words to a conveyance." The statute...
Full view - About this book

Breach of Trust

Peter Birks, Arianna Pretto - Law - 2002 - 405 pages
...conspiracy. The story is most famously captured by Lord Hardwicke's dictum that a solemnly enacted statute "had no other effect than to add at most three words to a conveyance" (Hopkins v Hopkins (1738) 1 Atk 581, 591, 26 ER 365, 372). It is inaccurate because the uses which...
Limited preview - About this book

Washington University Studies, Volume 1

Washington University (Saint Louis, Mo.) - Language and languages - 1914
...possession as was requisite before the statute." Lord Hardwicke " Vaugh., p. 50. said 17 that the statute had no other effect than to add at most three words to a conveyance. But its first effect seems, however, contrary to many opinions, to have been quite what was intended.18...
Full view - About this book




  1. My library
  2. Help
  3. Advanced Book Search
  4. Download EPUB
  5. Download PDF