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" GOD ALMIGHTY first planted a Garden. And indeed it is the purest of human pleasures. It is the greatest refreshment to the spirits of man; without which buildings and palaces are but gross... "
The Horticultural Register - Page 50
1834
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The Works of Alexander Pope: Esq. with Notes and Illustrations by ..., Volume 8

Alexander Pope, William Roscoe - English literature - 1824
...Poet's good taste in gardening was unquestionable. " For the honour of this art," Lord Bacon says, " a man shall ever see, that when ages grow to civility...finely ; as if gardening were the greater perfection." Warton. The taste in gardening, like all other arts, must be progressive. The taste of Pope was perhaps...
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The Works of Alexander Popekesq., with Notes and Illustrations by ..., Volume 8

Alexander Pope - 1824
...Poet's good taste in gardening was unquestionable. " For the honour of this art," Lord Bacon says, " a man shall ever see, that when ages grow to civility...finely ; as if gardening were the greater perfection." Warton. The taste in gardening, like all other arts, must be progressive. The taste of Pope was perhaps...
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The Works of Francis Bacon, Lord Chancellor of England..: Essays ...

Francis Bacon - English prose literature - 1825
...greatest refreshment to the spirits of man; without which buildings and palaces are but gross handyworks : and a man shall ever see, that, when ages grow to...the greater perfection. I do hold it in the royal ordering of gardens, there ought to be gardens for all the months in the year, in which, severally,...
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The Works of Francis Bacon: Lord Chancellor of England, Volume 1

Francis Bacon - 1825
...refreshment to the spirits of man ; without which buildings and palaces are but gross handyworks : and a man shall ever see, that, when ages grow to...the greater perfection. I do hold it in the royal ordering of gardens, there ought to be gardens for all the months in the year, in which, severally,...
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The Works of Francis Bacon, Lord Chancellor of England

Francis Bacon, Basil Montagu - 1825
...which buildings and palaces are but gross handyworks : and a man shall ever see, that, when ages rrow to civility and elegancy, men come to build stately,...the greater perfection. I do hold it in the royal ordering of gardens, there ought to be gardens for all the months in the year, in which, severally,...
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Gaieties and Gravities: A Series of Essays, Comic Tales, and ..., Volume 1

Horace Smith - English essays - 1825 - 699 pages
...in splenetic vacancy. Having mentioned the name of Bacon, let us not omit to record his assertion, that " when ages grow to civility and elegancy, men...finely ; as if gardening were the greater perfection :" a remark no less honourable to the noble science of horticulture, than historically accordant with...
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Literary and Miscellaneous Memoirs, Volume 1

Joseph Cradock - France - 1826
...allowance, outweigh a whole theatre of others." I have always been much pleased with Bacon's remark, that " when ages grow to civility and elegancy, men...finely ;" as if gardening were the greater perfection. A fine taste in gardening has not till lately been much estimated. Ben Jonson coldly says, " In a meadow,...
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The Practical Gardener, and Modern Horticulturist: Containing the ..., Volume 1

Charles McIntosh - Gardening - 1828 - 1264 pages
...notwithstanding the progress of the sister art of architecture, which gave rise to his lordship's remark, " That when ages grow to civility and elegancy, men...finely ; as if gardening were the greater perfection." The garden of Tarqumius Superbus, five hundred and four years before Christ, is mentioned by Livy and...
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The London encyclopaedia, or, Universal dictionary of ..., Part 2, Volume 9

Thomas Curtis (of Grove house sch, Islington)
...In the royal ordering of gardcru, there ought to be garden* for all the months in the year. Bacon. When ages grow to civility and elegancy, men come...finely ; as if gardening were the greater perfection. Id. Gardeners tread down any loos.' ground, after they have sown onions or turnips. /•.'. Natural...
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Moral, Economical, and Political Essays

Francis Bacon - English essays - 1833 - 216 pages
...greatest refreshment to the spirits of man; without which buildings and palace? are but gross handiworks : and a man shall ever see, that, when ages grow to...the greater perfection. I do hold it, in the royal ordering of gardens, there ought to be gardens for all the months in the year, in which, severally,...
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