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" GOD ALMIGHTY first planted a Garden. And indeed it is the purest of human pleasures. It is the greatest refreshment to the spirits of man; without which buildings and palaces are but gross... "
The Horticultural Register - Page 50
1834
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The Cultivator, Volume 3

Agriculture - 1846
...than refined horticultural pursuits. " When nations grow to civility and elegance," said Lord Bacon, " men come to build stately sooner than to garden finely, as if gardening were the greater perfection," — a perfection on the prevalence of which, even our republican edifice in a great measure must owe...
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The Cultivator, a Monthly Journal Devoted to Agriculture, horitcluture ...

The Cultivator - 1846
...than refined horticultural pursuits. " When nations grow to civility and elegance," said Lord Bacon, " men come to build stately sooner than to garden finely, as if gardening were the greater perfection,"—a perfection on the prevalence of which, even our republican edifice in a great measure...
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The Churchman's companion

1880
...greatest refreshment to the spirits of man, without which buildings and palaces are but gross handiworks, and a man shall ever see that when ages grow to civility...finely, as if gardening were the greater perfection." Many of our common flowers and even fruit-trees were first introduced in the monastic ages, the good...
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The works of Alexander Pope, with notes and illustrations, by ..., Volume 6

Alexander Pope - 1847
...poet's good taste in gardening was unquestionable. " For the honour of this art," Lord Bacon says, " a man shall ever see, that when ages grow to civility...finely ; as if gardening were the greater perfection." — Warton. The taste in gardening, like all other arts, must be progressive. The taste of Pope was...
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Castles in the air, Volume 3

Catherine Grace F. Gore, Mrs. Gore (Catherine Grace Frances) - 1847
...refreshment to the spirits of man ; without which, buildings and palaces are but gross handiworks : and man shall ever see, that, when ages grow to civility...finely; as if gardening were the greater perfection." Hints were sometimes thrown out by the Howard Smiths, touching the folly of wasting large sums upon...
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Some advice to the people; be not conceited [&c.] a poem

Calamus Kurrens (pseud.) - 1847
...and buildings are but gross handyworks. A man " shall ever see that when ages grow to civility arid elegancy, men come to " build stately, sooner than...garden finely ; as if gardening were the " greater perfection."—LORD BACON. " Mira qusedam in colendis floribus suavitas, et delectatio."—CICERO....
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Memoirs of Viscountess Sundon: Mistress of the Robes to Queen ..., Volume 2

Mrs. A. T. Thomson - Courts and courtiers - 1847
...man shall ever see that when ages grow to civility and elegancy, men come to build stately, soon then to garden finely, as if gardening were the greater perfection. I do hold it that in the Royal ordering of gardens, there ought to be gardens for all the months in the year, in...
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Essays, orations and lectures

Ralph Waldo Emerson - 1848 - 385 pages
...greatest refreshment to the spirits of man, without which, buildings and palaces are but gross handiworks; and a man shall ever see that when ages grow to civility...finely, as if gardening were the greater perfection." Bacon has followed up this sentiment in his two Essays on Buildings, and on Gardens, with many pleasing...
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The Journal of the Indian archipelago and eastern Asia (ed. by J.R ..., Volume 3

James Richardson Logan - 1849
...is the greatest refreshment to the spirits of man, without which building and palaces are bat grw» handy works : and a man shall ever see that when ages...finely, as if gardening were the greater perfection." So wrote Francis Lord Bacon near 300 years ago, and this pleasure still exists in the human heart as...
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An Historical Inquiry Into the True Principles of Beauty in Art: More ...

James Fergusson - Aesthetics - 1849 - 537 pages
...it is the purest of human pleasures, without which buildings and palaces are but gross handiworks ; and a man shall ever see that when ages grow to civility...finely, as if gardening were the greater perfection." Which is perhaps true, as far as it goes; but gardens want that durability which gives to buildings...
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