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" GOD ALMIGHTY first planted a Garden. And indeed it is the purest of human pleasures. It is the greatest refreshment to the spirits of man; without which buildings and palaces are but gross... "
The Horticultural Register - Page 50
1834
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Flowers and Flower-gardens

David Lester Richardson - Flower gardening - 1855 - 232 pages
...of course meant to attach to a Royal residence as Eoyal a garden ; but as Bacon says, '.'men begin to build stately sooner than to garden finely, as if gardening were the greater perfection." The mansion of Alcinous was of brazen walls with golden columns ; and the Greeks and Eomans had houses...
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The Essays: Or, Counsels, Civil and Moral ; and The Wisdom of the Ancients

Francis Bacon - English essays - 1856 - 360 pages
...refreshment to the spirits of man ; without which buildings and palaces are but gross handyworks ; and a man shall ever see, that, when ages grow to...the greater perfection. I do hold it, in the royal ordering of gardens, there ought to be gardens for all the months in the year, in which, severally,...
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Cicero's Three Books of Offices: Or, Moral Duties. Also His Cato Major, an ...

Marcus Tullius Cicero - 1856 - 342 pages
...refreshment to the spirits of man ; without which buildings and palaces are but gross handy-works, and a man shall ever see, that, when ages grow to...sooner than to garden finely; as if gardening were the j;reatef perfection." — Lord Bacon, Essay 46. such great trunks and branches from so small a grain...
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Bacon's essays, with annotations by R. Whately

Francis Bacon (visct. St. Albans.) - 1856
...are but gross handyworks : and a man shall ever see, that when ages grow to civility' and elegancy,3 men come to build stately, sooner than to garden finely...the greater perfection. I do hold it, in the royal ordering of gardens, there ought to be gardens for all the months in the year, in which, severally,...
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Transactions of the Illinois State Horticultural Society, Volume 17

Illinois State Horticultural Society - Gardening - 1883
...greatest refreshment to the spirits of man; without which buildings and palaces are but gross handiworks, and a man shall ever see, that, when ages grow to...finely; as if gardening were the greater perfection." There is an inspiration in simply reading a description of his ideal garden, or rather gardens, for...
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The Harvard Classics, Volume 3

Literature - 1909
...when ages grow to civility and elegancy, men come to build 10 Retiring-room. " Secret outlets. HCin 8 stately sooner than to garden finely ; as if gardening...the greater perfection. I do hold it, in the royal ordering of gardens, there ought to be gardens for all the months in the year ; in which severally...
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Recreation

Play - 1937
...palaces are but gross handiworks; and a man shall ever see that when ages grow to civility and elegance, men come to build stately sooner than to garden finely, as if gardening were the greater perfection." — Francis Bacon. of the McKinley Vocational School and the Board of Education of the City of Buffalo,...
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The Collected Works of Ralph Waldo Emerson: Nature, addresses, and lectures

Ralph Waldo Emerson, Alfred Riggs Ferguson, Joseph Slater, Jean Ferguson Carr - Literary Criticism - 1971 - 333 pages
...greatest refreshment to the spirits of man, without which, buildings and palaces are but gross handyworks; and a man shall ever see that when ages grow to civility...finely, as if gardening were the greater perfection." Bacon has followed up this sentiment in his two Essays on Buildings, and on Gardens, with many pleasing...
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The Quarterly Review, Volume 16

English literature - 1816
...purest of human pleasures; it is the greatest refreshment to the spirits of man, without which buildmgs and palaces are but gross handy works ; and a man...finely, as if gardening were the greater perfection.' Long after this great man wrote, an English garden was an inclosure, where all view of the surrounding...
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The Cornhill Magazine, Volume 13; Volume 86

William Makepeace Thackeray - Electronic journals - 1902
...URBAXUS SYLVAX. THE TRUE ORDERING OF GARDENS. ' WHEN ages grow to civility and elegancy,' said Bacon, ' men come to build stately, sooner than to garden finely ; as if gardening were the greater perfection.' And then he unwittingly impales himself on the point of his own epigram ; for he proceeds to lay out...
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