Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Books Books
" Our remedies oft in ourselves do lie, Which we ascribe to Heaven : the fated sky Gives us free scope ; only, doth backward pull Our slow designs, when we ourselves are dull. "
The Plays of William Shakespeare - Page 8
by William Shakespeare - 1803
Full view - About this book

The Divine Average: A View of Comedy

William G. McCollom - Comedy - 1971 - 231 pages
[ Sorry, this page's content is restricted ]
Snippet view - About this book

Shakespeare's Eden: The Commonwealth of England, 1558-1629

Bertram Leon Joseph - England - 1971 - 368 pages
[ Sorry, this page's content is restricted ]
Snippet view - About this book

Shakespeare: the Dark Comedies to the Last Plays: From Satire to Celebration

R. A. Foakes - Literary Criticism - 1971 - 186 pages
[ Sorry, this page's content is restricted ]
Snippet view - About this book

The Twentieth Century, Volume 64

Nineteenth century - 1908
...Brutus, is not in our stars, j ,, * But in ourselves, that we are underlings. And the words of Helena : Our remedies oft in ourselves do lie, Which we ascribe...pull Our slow designs when we ourselves are dull. Now see how emphatic Dante is in saying the same thing — namely, that sin is deliberate perversion...
Full view - About this book

Worlds and Underworlds: Anglo-European History Through the Centuries

Peter Vansittart - Europe - 1974 - 316 pages
[ Sorry, this page's content is restricted ]
Snippet view - About this book

From Story to Stage: The Dramatic Adaptation of Prose Fiction in the Period ...

Max Bluestone - English drama - 1974 - 341 pages
[ Sorry, this page's content is restricted ]
Snippet view - About this book

The Last Frontier: The Social Meaning of Growing Old

Andrea Fontana - Social Science - 1977 - 215 pages
[ Sorry, this page's content is restricted ]
Snippet view - About this book

Shakespeare's Prophetic Mind

A. C. Harwood - Literary Criticism - 1964 - 63 pages
...stars, But in ourselves, that we are underlings'. And thus Helena in All's Well that Ends Well (1604): 'Our remedies oft in ourselves do lie Which we ascribe...pull Our slow designs when we ourselves are dull'. In Lear (1606) it is true that Gloucester blames eclipses for the evils of Society. But the new and...
Limited preview - About this book

Shakespeare's Changing Use of Psychological Reference in His Comedies

Carlyle Paff Hedrick - 1978 - 504 pages
[ Sorry, this page's content is restricted ]
Snippet view - About this book




  1. My library
  2. Help
  3. Advanced Book Search
  4. Download EPUB
  5. Download PDF