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" But we may go further, and affirm most truly that it is a mere and miserable solitude to want true friends ; without which the world is but a wilderness ; and even in this sense also of solitude, whosoever in the frame of his nature and affections is... "
The Monthly Visitor, and Entertaining Pocket Companion - Page 332
1801
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The Eton School Magazine

College student newspapers and periodicals - 1842
...friend, almost one only, faithful friend." MOULTRIE. ON ETON FRIENDSHIPS. 71 the frame of his nature aiid affections is unfit for friendship, he taketh it of the beast, and not from humanity." No one, we suppose, will deny that friendship is one of the greatest blessings which God has left man...
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Cyclopędia of English Literature, Volume 1

Robert Chambers - English literature - 1844
...solitude to want true friends, without which the world is but a wilderness ; and, степ in this scene OPEDIA OF то 1Я5. Nor any but yourself, О dearest...That when your pleasure is to deem aright, Ye may fulnces of the heart, which passions of all kinds do cause and induce. We know diseases of stoppings...
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The Illustrated Family Magazine, Volumes 3-4

Robert L. Wade - United States - 1846
...again under the innocent form of delight in which it first came before him. Richter. FRIENDSHIP. — A principal fruit of friendship is the ease and discharge of the fulness and swellings of the heart, which passions of all kinds do cause and induce. We know diseases of stoppings...
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Cyclopędia of English Literature: A Selection of the Choicest Productions ...

Robert Chambers - English literature - 1847
...solitude to want true friends, without which the world is but a wilderness ; and, even in this scene 's door. [Ida Canfas JVtou'rt Smooth and Fair.] 1 do confess thou'rt smooth and fair, And I migh lie taketh it of the beast, and not from humanity. A principal fruit of friendship is the ease and...
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The Works of Francis Bacon, Lord Chancellor of England, Volume 1

Francis Bacon - 1850
...most truly, that it is a mere and miserable solitude to want true friends, without which the world H lafcndshijMs tho ease and dischargujjf the fulness, and swellings of the heart, which passions of all...
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Cyclopaedia of English Literature: A Selection of the Choicest ..., Volume 1

Robert Chambers - English literature - 1850
...solitude to want true friends, without which the world is but a wilderness ; and, evtn in this scene of sev . fulucss of the heart, which passions of all kinds do cause and induce. We know diseases of stoppings...
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Works

Francis Bacon - 1850
...most truly, that it is a mere and miserable solitude, to want true friends, without which the world is but a wilderness. And even in this sense also of...he taketh it of the beast, and not from humanity. JA principal fruit of friendship is the ease and discharge of the fulness and swellings of the heart,...
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The Literature and the Literary Men of Great Britain and Ireland, Volume 1

Abraham Mills - English literature - 1851
...solitude to want true friends, without which the world is but a wilderness ; and, even in this scene also of solitude, whosoever, in the frame of his nature...fruit of friendship is the ease and discharge of the fullness of the heart, which passions of all kinds do cause and induce. We know diseases of stoppings...
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The Literature and the Literary Men of Great Britain and Ireland, Volume 1

Abraham Mills - English literature - 1851
...world is but a wilderness ; and, even in this scene also of solitude, whosoever, in the frame of bis nature and affections, is unfit for friendship, he...fruit of friendship is the ease and discharge of the fullness of the heart, which passions of all kinds do cause and induce. We know diseases of stoppings...
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The essays; or, Counsels civil and moral, with notes by A. Spiers

Francis Bacon (visct. St. Albans.) - 1851
...nature and affections is unfit for friendship, he taketh it of the beast, and not from humanity. 2. A principal fruit of friendship is the ease and discharge of the fulness and swellings of the heart, which passions of all kinds do cause and induce. We know diseases of stoppings...
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