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" But we may go further, and affirm most truly that it is a mere and miserable solitude to want true friends ; without which the world is but a wilderness ; and even in this sense also of solitude, whosoever in the frame of his nature and affections is... "
The Monthly Visitor, and Entertaining Pocket Companion - Page 332
1801
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The Works Of France Bacon

Basil Montagu - 1852
...most truly, that it is a mere and miserable solitude to want true friends, without which the world is but a wilderness ; and even in this sense also...friendship is the ease and discharge of the fulness and swellings of the heart, which passions of all kinds do cause and induce. We know diseases of stoppings...
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The essays; or, Counsels civil and moral with A table of the colours of good ...

Francis Bacon (visct. St. Albans.) - 1853
...most truly, that it is a mere and miserable solitude to want true friends, without which the world is but a wilderness: and even in this sense also of...friendship is the ease and discharge of the fulness and swellings of the heart, which passions of all kinds do cause and induce. We know diseases of stoppings...
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Cyclopędia of English Literature: A Selection of the Choicest Productins of ...

Robert Chambers - Authors, English - 1853
...solitude to want true friends, without which the world is but a wilderness ; and, even in this scene also of solitude, whosoever, in the frame of his nature and affections, is unlit for friendship, he taketh it of the beast, and not from humanity. A principal fruit of friendship...
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Social and Political Morality

William Lovett - Conduct of life - 1853 - 204 pages
...ensphering love into form and expression, is the office of friendship. Bacon goes so far as to say that " a principal fruit of friendship is the ease and discharge of the fullness of the heart." He goes on in his noble and wise way to name its other points, and nothing...
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The Works of Lord Bacon: Philosophical works

Francis Bacon - 1854
...most truly, that it is a mere and miserable solitude, to want true friends, without which the world ng ; for lies are sufficient to breed opinion, and...sharpeneth another : in cases of great enterprise, upon cha and swellings of the heart, which passions of all kinds do cause and induce. We know diseases of stoppings...
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THE LITERATURE AND THE LITERARY MEN OF Great Britain and Ireland

ABRAHAM MILLS, A.M. - 1856
...solitude to want true friends, without which the world is but a wilderness : and, even in this scene also of solitude, whosoever, in the frame of his nature...fruit of friendship is the ease and discharge of the fullness of the heart, which passions of all kinds do cause and induce. We know diseases of stoppings...
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Bacon's essays, with annotations by R. Whately

Francis Bacon (visct. St. Albans.) - 1856
...solitude to want true friends, without which the world is but a wilderness ; and, even in this scene also of solitude, whosoever, in the frame of his nature...friendship, he taketh it of the beast, and not from humanity.7 A principal fruit of friendship is the ease and discharge of 1 Aristotle, .EM., M. 8. 1...
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The Essays: Or, Counsels, Civil and Moral ; and The Wisdom of the Ancients

Francis Bacon - English essays - 1856 - 360 pages
...most truly, that it is a mere and miserable solitude to want true friends, without which the world is but a wilderness ; and even in this sense also...the frame of his nature and affections is unfit for 1 Epimenides, a poet of Crete, (of which Candia is the modern name,) is said by rliny to have fallen...
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The North American Review, Volume 83

Jared Sparks, Edward Everett, James Russell Lowell, Henry Cabot Lodge - American fiction - 1856
...wisdom, also worthy of his shrewd eye to self-advancement. " A principal fruit of friendship is the ease of the fulness of the heart which passions of all kinds do cause." " How m.any things are there which are blushing in a man's own mouth, but graceful in a friend's !...
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The North British review, Volume 27

1857
...solitude to want true friends, without which the world is but a wilderness ; nnd, even in this scene also of solitude, whosoever in the frame of his nature...he taketh it of the beast, and not from humanity." The first three of the Essays, which appeared for the first time in the edition of 1825, and are probably...
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