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" But we may go further, and affirm most truly that it is a mere and miserable solitude to want true friends ; without which the world is but a wilderness ; and even in this sense also of solitude, whosoever in the frame of his nature and affections is... "
The Monthly Visitor, and Entertaining Pocket Companion - Page 332
1801
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Lord Bacon's Essays: With a Sketch of His Life and Character, Reviews of His ...

Francis Bacon - 1867 - 426 pages
...beyond humanity. '—Philip Sidney. miserable solitude to want true friends, without which the world is but a wilderness : and even in this sense also...he taketh it of the beast, and not from humanity. [4] A principal fruit of friendship is the ease and discharge of the fulness of the heart, which passions...
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Bacon's Essays

Francis Bacon - Conduct of life - 1868 - 641 pages
...solitude to want true friends, without which the world is but a wilderness ; and, even in this scene also of solitude, whosoever, in the frame of his nature...principal fruit of friendship is the ease and discharge of 1 Aristotle, Elh., B. 8. ' Aversution towards. Aversion to. 'There is such a general aversation in...
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Bacon's Essays: And Colours of Good and Evil

Francis Bacon - English essays - 1868 - 388 pages
...meere, and miserable Solitude, to want true Frends; without which the World is but a Wildernesse : And even in this sense also of Solitude, whosoever...the Frame of his Nature and Affections, is unfit for Frendship, he taketh it of the Beast, and not from Humanity. A principall Fruit of Frendship, is the...
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Bacon's Essays and Colours of Good and Evil

Francis Bacon - 1868 - 388 pages
...meere, and miserable Solitude, to want true Frends; without which the World, is but a Wildernesse : And even in this sense also of Solitude, whosoever in the Frame of his Nature and Affecflions, is unfit for Frendship, he taketh it of the Beast, and not from Humanity. A principall...
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A Thousand and One Gems of English Prose

Charles Mackay - English prose - 1872 - 534 pages
...solitude to want true friends, without which the world is but a wilderness ; and, even in this scene also of solitude, whosoever, in the frame of his nature...he taketh it of the beast, and not from humanity. . . . This communicating of a man's self to his friend, works two contrary effects, for it redoubleth...
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The Essays of Lord Bacon

Francis Bacon - English essays - 1873 - 240 pages
...most truly, that it is a mere and miserable solitude to want true friends, without which the world is but a wilderness : and even in this sense also...friendship is the ease and discharge of the fulness and swellings of the heart, which passions of all kinds do cause and induce. We know diseases of stoppings...
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Bacon's Essays

Francis Bacon - Conduct of life - 1874 - 641 pages
...solitude to want true friends, without which the world is but a wilderness; and, even in this scene also of solitude, whosoever, in the frame of his nature...principal fruit of friendship is the ease and discharge of 1 Aristotle, Eth., B. 8. * Aversation towards. Aversion to. 'There is snch a general aversation in...
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Twenty of Bacon's essays, ed. by F. Storr

Francis Bacon (visct. St. Albans.) - 1874
...most truly, that it is a mere1 5 and miserable solitude to want true friends, without which the world is but a wilderness; and, even in this sense also...he taketh it of the beast, and not from humanity. 16 A principal fruit of friendship is the ease and discharge of the fulness and swellings of the heart,...
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The treasury of David: containing an original exposition of the ..., Volume 4

Charles Haddon Spurgeon - 1874
...most truly, that it is a mere and miserable solitude to want true friends, without which the world is but a wilderness ; and even in this sense also...he taketh it of the beast, and not from humanity. — Francis Bacon. Verse 7. — " Alone." See the reason why people in trouble love solitariness. They...
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Chambers's Cyclopędia of English Literature: A History, Critical ..., Volume 1

Robert Chambers, Robert Carruthers - Authors, English - 1876
...most truly, that it is a mere and miserable solitude to want true friends, without which the world mbers and swellings of the heart, which passions of all kinds do cause and induce. We know diseases of stoppings...
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