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" But we may go further, and affirm most truly that it is a mere and miserable solitude to want true friends ; without which the world is but a wilderness ; and even in this sense also of solitude, whosoever in the frame of his nature and affections is... "
The Monthly Visitor, and Entertaining Pocket Companion - Page 332
1801
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Masterpieces of English Literature: Being Typical Selections of British and ...

William Swinton - American literature - 1880 - 638 pages
...most truly that it is a mere* and miserable solitude to want true friends, without which the world is but a wilderness ; and even in this sense also...he taketh it of the beast, and not from humanity. 25 3. A principal fruit of friendship is the ease and discharge of the fulness and swellings of the...
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Prose Quotations from Socrates to Macaulay: With Indexes. Authors, 544 ...

Samuel Austin Allibone - Quotations, English - 1880 - 764 pages
...solitude to want true friends, without which the world is but a wilderness; and even in this scene ge men to obey a body of laws that are both of such a bulk and LORD BACON: Essay XXVIII., Of Friendship. A principal fruit of friendship is the ease and discharge...
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Text-book of Prose from Burke, Webster, and Bacon: With Notes, and Sketches ...

Henry Norman Hudson - 1881
...most truly, that it is a mere 2 and miserable solitude to want true friends, without which the world is but a wilderness ; and, even in this sense also...friendship is the ease and discharge of the fulness and swellings of the heart, which passions of all kinds do cause and induce. We know diseases of stoppings...
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Bacon's Essays, Volume 1

Francis Bacon - 1881
...truly, t at it is a mere and miserable solitude to want true friends, without which the world is •5 but a wilderness. And, even in this sense also of...humanity. A principal fruit of friendship is the ease and dis30 charge of the fulness of the heart, which passions of all kinds do cause and induce. We know...
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The English Essayists: A Comprehensive Selection from the Works of the Great ...

English essays - 1881 - 536 pages
...most truly, that it is a mere and miserable solitude, to want true friends, without which the world sometimes, takethit of the beast, and not from humanity. A principal fruit of friendship is the ease and discharge...
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Englische Studien, Volume 4

Eugen Kölbing, Johannes Hoops, Reinald Hoops - Comparative linguistics - 1881
...unterschied zwischen from und of im wesentlichen beachtet finde. Wenn Bacon (Essays 27.) schreibt: Whosoever, in the frame of his nature and affections,...he taketh it of the beast, and not from humanity, so wird er die präposition nicht ohne grund gewechselt haben. Zu vergleichen sind auch Hume l, 254...
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On the Threshold

Theodore Thornton Munger - Conduct of life - 1881 - 228 pages
...ensphering love into form and expression is the office of friendship. Bacon goes so far as to say that " a principal fruit of friendship is the ease and discharge of the fullness of the heart." He goes on in his noble and wise way to name its other points, and nothing...
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The Moral and Historical Works of Lord Bacon: Including His Essays ...

Francis Bacon - 1882 - 504 pages
...most truly, that it is a mere and miserable solitude to want true friends, without which the world is but a wilderness ; and even in this sense also...he taketh it of the beast, and not from humanity. .JA principal fruit of friendship is the ease and discharge of the fulness and swellings of the heart,...
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The Treasury of David: Containing an Original Exposition of the ..., Volume 4

Charles Haddon Spurgeon - Bible - 1882
...most truly, that it is a mere and miserable solitude to want true friends, without which the world is but a wilderness ; and even in this sense also...taketh it of the beast, and not from humanity.— F¡'ancis Bacon. Verse 7. — '.'Alone.'' See the reason why people in trouble love solitariness. They...
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Studies in English and American Literature, from Chaucer to the Present Time ...

Albert Newton Raub - American literature - 1882 - 468 pages
...most truly that it is a mere and miserahle solitude to want true friends, without which 2S the world is but a wilderness ; and even in this sense also...nature and affections is unfit for friendship, he takcth it of the beast, and not of humanity. A principal fruit of friendship is the ease and dis- 30...
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