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" But we may go further, and affirm most truly that it is a mere and miserable solitude to want true friends ; without which the world is but a wilderness ; and even in this sense also of solitude, whosoever in the frame of his nature and affections is... "
The Monthly Visitor, and Entertaining Pocket Companion - Page 332
1801
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Essays, moral, economical, and political

Francis Bacon (visct. St. Albans.) - 1882
...most truly, that it is a mere and miserable solitude to want true friends, without which the world is but a wilderness; and even in this sense also of solitude, whosoever in the frame of his nature aud affections is unfit for friendship; he taketh it of the beast, and not from humanity. A principal...
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Essays

Francis Bacon - 1883 - 217 pages
...most truly, that it is a mere and miserable solitude to want true friends, without which the world is but a wilderness; and even in this sense also of...friendship is the ease and discharge of the fulness and swellings of the heart, which passions of all kinds do cause aud induce. We know diseases of stoppings...
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Francis Bacon: (Lord Verulam.): A Critical Review of His Life and Character

Benjamin G. Lovejoy - 1883 - 277 pages
...most truly, that it is a meref and miserable solitude to want true friends, without which the world is but a wilderness ; and even in this sense also...fruit of friendship is the ease and discharge of the fullness and swellings of the heart, which passions of all kinds do cause and induce. We know diseases...
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The Promus of Formularies and Elegancies

Francis Bacon, William Shakespeare, Constance Mary (Fearon) Pott, Mrs. Henry Pott - 1883 - 628 pages
...1169. Cause of Society, acquaintance, familiarity in friends. (Compare Essay Of Friendship, ' Whosoever is unfit for friendship, he taketh it of the beast and not of humanity,' Ac., with Tim. Ath. i. 1, ' He's opposite to humanity,' <fec.) A natural hatred and aversion...
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The essays of lord Bacon, including his moral and historical works, with ...

Francis Bacon (visct. St. Albans.) - 1884
...most truly, that it is a mere and miserable solitude to want true friends, without which the world is but a wilderness. And, even in this sense also...he taketh it of the beast, and not from humanity. It is a strange thing to observe how high a rate great kings and monarchs do set upon this fruit of...
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Essays: And Wisdom of the Ancients

Francis Bacon - 1884 - 425 pages
...most truly, that it is a mere and miserable solitude to want true friends, without which the world is but a wilderness; and even in this sense also of...affections is unfit for friendship, he taketh it of the beasts, and not from humanity. A principal fruit of friendship is the ease and discharge of the fulness...
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Bacon's Essays and Wisdom of the Ancients

Francis Bacon - English essays - 1884 - 425 pages
...most truly, that it is a mere and miserable solitude to want true friends, without which the world is but a wilderness ; and even in this sense also...affections is unfit for friendship, he taketh it of the beasts, and not from humanity. A principal fruit of friendship is the ease and discharge of the fulness...
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Bacon's Essays and Wisdom of the Ancients

Francis Bacon - English essays - 1884 - 425 pages
...most truly, that it is a mere and miserable solitude to want true friends, without which the world is but a wilderness; and even in this sense also of...affections is unfit for friendship, he taketh it of the beasts, and not from humanity. A principal fruit of friendship is the ease and discharge of the fulness...
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Chapters in the History of English Literature: From 1509 to the Close of the ...

Ellen Crofts - England - 1884 - 374 pages
...accordance with his theory of life. Friendship to him was an important thing and an elevated thing. " Whosoever in the frame of his nature and affections...friendship, he taketh it of the beast and not from humanity " : but friendships are contracted but for the mutual interests of either party. " A principal part...
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British Classical Authors. Select Specimens of the National Literature of ...

Ludwig Herrig - 1885 - 708 pages
...most truly, that it is a mere and miserable solitude, to want true friends, without which the world n the right Went down into boast and not from humanity. It is a strange thing to observe how high a rate great kings and monarchs...
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