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" Certainly virtue is like precious odours, most fragrant when they are incensed or crushed ; for Prosperity doth best discover vice, but Adversity doth best discover virtue. "
Bacon's essays, with intr., notes and index by E.A. Abbott - Page 13
by Francis Bacon (visct. St. Albans.) - 1876
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The Christian Treasury, Volume 5

Protestantism - 1850
...needleworks and embroideries, it is more pleasing to have a lively work upon a sad and solemn ground, than to have a dark and melancholy work upon a lightsome ground : judge, therefore, of the pleasures of the heart by tlie pleasures of the eye. Certainly virtue is like precious odours— most...
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Ears of corn from various sheaves: thoughts for the closet, ed. by S. Lettis

Ears - 1851
...needleworks and embroideries, it is more pleasing to have a lively work upon a sad and solemn ground than to have a dark and melancholy work upon a lightsome...prosperity doth best discover vice, but adversity doth best discover virtue. — Lord Bacon. HE who builds upon the present, builds upon the narrow compass...
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Select English poetry, with notes by E. Hughes

Edward Hughes - 1851
...needle-works and embroideries, it is more pleasing to have lively work upon a sad and solemn ground, than to have a dark and melancholy work upon a lightsome...Certainly, virtue is like precious odours, most fragrant where they are incensed, or crushed ; for prosperity doth best discover vice, but adversity doth best...
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The essays; or, Counsels civil and moral, with notes by A. Spiers

Francis Bacon (visct. St. Albans.) - 1851
...needle-works and embroideries, it is more pleasing to have a lively work upon a sad and solemn ground, than to have a dark and melancholy work upon a lightsome...Certainly virtue is like precious odours, most fragrant where they are incensed, or crushed; for prosperity doth best discover vice, but adversity doth best...
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General Report on Public Instruction in the Bengal Presidency

Education - 1851
...needle-works and embroideries, it is more pleasant to have a lively work upon a sad and solemn ground than to have a dark and melancholy work upon a lightsome...pleasure of the heart by the pleasure of the eye." What are these images of, viz., the " lively work ;" the " sad and solemn ground;" the "dark and melancholy...
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The Literature and the Literary Men of Great Britain and Ireland, Volume 1

Abraham Mills - English literature - 1851
...to have a lively work upon a sad and solemn ground, than to have a dark and melancholy work upon * lightsome ground ; judge, therefore, of the pleasure...Certainly virtue is like precious odours, most fragrant where they are incensed or crushed : for prosperity doth best discover vice, but adversity doth best...
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The Literature and the Literary Men of Great Britain and Ireland, Volume 1

Abraham Mills - English literature - 1851
...the heart by the pleasure of the eye. Certainly virtue is like precious odours, most fragrant where they are incensed or crushed : for prosperity doth best discover vice, but adversity doth, best discover virtue. FRIENDSHIP. It had been hard for him that spake it, to have put more truth and...
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The Eclectic review. vol. 1-New [8th]

1851
...similar circumstances, but few votaries. As Lord Bacon says of virtue, we may say of religion — it is like precious odours, most fragrant when they are incensed or crushed. Of his early years we know little. They were overshadowed, we know, by one cloud — the Great Plague....
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The Eclectic Review

Samuel Greatheed, Daniel Parken, Theophilus Williams, Josiah Conder, Thomas Price, Jonathan Edwards Ryland, Edwin Paxton Hood - English literature - 1851
...similar circumstances, but few votaries. As Lord Bacon says of virtue, we may say of religion—- it is like precious odours, most fragrant when they are incensed or crushed. Of his early years we know little. They were overshadowed, we know, by one cloud — the Great Plague....
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The Modern British Essayists: Macaulay, T.B. Essays

English essays - 1852
...needleworks and embroideries it is more pleasing to have a lively work upon a sad and solemn ground, than mpt From the narrative of Herodotus, it should seem that they still looked up, with the f ye. Certainly virtue is like precious odours, most fragrant when they are incensed or crashed ; for...
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