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" Vice is a monster of so frightful mien, As, to be hated, needs but to be seen; Yet seen too oft, familiar with her face, We first endure, then pity, then embrace. "
English Exercises, Adapted to Murray's English Grammar: ... Designed for the ... - Page 27
by Lindley Murray - 1812 - 192 pages
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Broome, Pope, Pitt, Thomson

Samuel Johnson - English poetry - 1810
...white ? Ask your own heart, and nothing is so plain ; Tis to mistake them, costs the time and pain* Vice is a monster of so frightful mien, As, to be...be seen; Yet seen too oft, familiar with her face, We 6rst endure,' then pity, then embrace. 220 But where th' extreme of vice, was ne'er agreed : Ask...
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The Works of the English Poets, from Chaucer to Cowper: Including ..., Volume 13

Samuel Johnson - English poetry - 1810 - 612 pages
...heart's prerogative to raise A royal trihute from the poorest hours; Immense revenue ! every moment pays, If nothing more than purpose in thy power; Thy purpose firm, is equal to the deed : Who does the hest his circumstance allows, Does well, acts nohly; angels could no more. Our outward act indeed admits...
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The Works of the English Poets, from Chaucer to Cowper: Including ..., Volume 12

Samuel Johnson - English poetry - 1810 - 526 pages
...plain ; 'Tis to mistake them, costs the time and pain. Vice it a monster of to frightful uiiun, As, to be hated, needs but to be seen; Yet seen too oft, familiar with her face, We first endure, then pity, then embrace. 220 But where th' extreme of vice, was ne'er agreed : Ask where's the north...
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The Works of the English Poets, from Chaucer to Cowper;: Watts, A. Philips ...

Samuel Johnson - English poetry - 1810
...prerogative to raise A royal tribute from the poorest hours ; luimrnse revenue ! every moment puys, If nothing more than purpose in thy power ; Thy purpose firm, is <qual to the deed : Who does the best his circumstance allows, Docs well, acts nobly ; angels could...
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The Works of the Right Reverend William Warburton ...

William Warburton - 1811
...once grown familiar with her, we first suffer, and in time begin to lose the memory of her nature : Vice is a monster of. so frightful mien, As, to be...too oft, familiar with her face, We first endure, then pity, then embrace. Which necessarily implies an equal ignorance in the G 3 nature nature of virtue....
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The Works of the Right Reverend William Warburton, D.D., Lord ..., Volume 11

William Warburton, Richard Hurd - Theology - 1811
...once grown tamiliar with her, we first suffer, and in time begin to lose the memory of her nature : Vice is a monster of so frightful mien, As, to be...too oft, familiar with her face, We first endure, then pity, then embrace. Which necessarily implies an equal ignorance in the c nature nature of virtue....
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The Works of the Rev. Dr. Edward Young

Edward Young - 1811
...prerogative to raise A royal tribute from the poorest hours ; Immense revenue ! ev'ry moment pays. If nothing more than purpose in thy power ; Thy purpose firm, is equal to the deed : Who doss the best his circumstance allows, Does well, acts nobly ; angels could no more. Our outoeardzct...
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The works of Alexander Pope. With a selection of explanatory notes ..., Volume 3

Alexander Pope - 1812
...? Ask your own heart, and nothing is so plain ; 215 'Tis to mistake them, costs the time and pain. Vice is a monster of so frightful mien, As, to be...too oft, familiar with her face, We first endure, then pity, then embrace. 220 But where th' extreme of vice, was ne'er agreed : Ask where's the north...
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The Freethinking Christians' Magazine: Intended for the Promotion ..., Volume 3

Liberalism (Religion) - 1813
...that is, he may possess the disposition to df good, although he may not have the means of doing it. " If nothing more than purpose in thy power, Thy purpose firm, is equal to the deed ; Who docs the best his circumstance allows, Doe* well — acts nobly — angels could no more.'' And, vise...
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Elegant poems. Pope's Essay on man, Blair's Grave, Gray's Elegy, Goldsmith's ...

Elegant poems - 1814
...But where the extreme of vice, was ne'er agreed, *sk where's-the North ? at York, 'tis on the Tweed ; Vice is a monster of so frightful mien, As, to be...too oft, familiar with her face, We first endure, then pity, then embrace. 220 In Scotland, at the Orcades; and there, At Greenland, Zembla, or the Lord...
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