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" I deny not, but that it is of greatest concernment in the Church and Commonwealth, to have a vigilant eye how books demean themselves as well as men; and thereafter to confine, imprison, and do sharpest justice on them as malefactors. For books are not... "
The World's Laconics: Or, The Best Thoughts of the Best Authors - Page 29
by Tryon Edwards - 1853 - 432 pages
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The Saturday Magazine, Volume 5

Periodicals - 1835
...thoughts the best way. SIR W. TEMPLE. BOOKS are not absolutely dead fixings, but doe contain a potencie of life in them, to be as active as that soul was whose progeny they ate; nay, they do preserve as in a yioll the purest efficacie and extraction of that living intellect...
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The Prose Works of John Milton

John Milton - 1835 - 976 pages
...them interminably precious. " Books," says their author, " are not absolutely dead things," — " they contain a progeny of life in them to be as active as that soul whose progeny they are," — " the precious life-blood of a master-spirit embalmed and treasured up...
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The Saturday Magazine, Volume 5

1835
...thoughts tho best way. SIK W. TEMPLB. BOOKS are not absolutely dead things, hut doe contain a potencie of life in them, to be as active as that soul was whoso progeny they arc; nay, they do preserve as in a viol I the purest eflicacie and extraction of...
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Lives of eminent and illustrious Englishmen, ed. by G. G. Cunningham, Volume 5

Englishmen - 1836
...and commonwealth, to have a vigilant eye how books demean themselves as well as men ; and thereafter to confine, imprison, and do sharpest justice on them...books are not absolutely dead things, but do contain a potency of life in them to be as active as that soul was whose progeny they are ; nay, they do preserve,...
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Lives of eminent and illustrious Englishmen, ed. by G. G. Cunningham, Volume 3

Englishmen - 1836
...vigilant eye how books demean themselves, as well as men. For books are not absolutely dead things, but contain a progeny of life in them to be as active as that soul was whose progeny they are. I know they are as lively and vigorously productive as those fabulous dragon's teeth ; and being sown...
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Annual Meeting: Proceedings, Constitution, List of Active Members, and Addresses

American Institute of Instruction - 1836
...than supply ideas ; they must be, as Milton says, " Not absolutely dead things, but contain a potency of life in them to be as active as that soul was, whose progeny they are ; nay, they must preserve as in a phial, the purest efficacy and extraction of that living intellect that bred...
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Annual Meeting of the American Institute of Instruction, Volume 6

American Institute of Instruction - Education - 1836
...than supply ideas ; they must be, as Milton says, " Not absolutely dead things, but contain a potency of life in them to be as active as that soul was, whose progeny they are ; nay, they must preserve as in a phial, the purest efficacy and extraction of that living intellect that bred...
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The Friend: A Series of Essays to Aid in the Formation of Fixed ..., Volume 1

Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Henry Nelson Coleridge - English literature - 1837 - 555 pages
...and commonwealth to have a vigilant eye how books demean themselves as well as men ; and thereafter to confine, imprison, and do sharpest justice on them...books are not absolutely dead things, but do contain a potency of life in them to be as active as that soul was whose progeny they are ; nay, they do preserve...
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Lives of eminent and illustrious Englishmen, ed. by G. G. Cunningham, Volume 3

Englishmen - 1837
...and commonwealth, to have a vigilant eye how books demean themselves as well as men ; and thereafter to confine, imprison, and do sharpest justice on them as malefactors ; for books arc' not absolutely dead things, but do contain a potency of life in them to be as active as that soul...
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The New-York Review, Volume 3

1838
...thoughts about books, still less to give them utterance. The student is accustomed to the reflection that "books are not absolutely dead things, but do contain...as active as that soul was whose progeny they are" — that "a good book is the precious life-blood of a master-spirit, embalmed and treasured up on purpose...
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