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" I deny not, but that it is of greatest concernment in the Church and Commonwealth, to have a vigilant eye how books demean themselves as well as men; and thereafter to confine, imprison, and do sharpest justice on them as malefactors. For books are not... "
The World's Laconics: Or, The Best Thoughts of the Best Authors - Page 29
by Tryon Edwards - 1853 - 432 pages
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The Complete Works of Samuel Taylor Coleridge: With an ..., Volume 2

Samuel Taylor Coleridge - 1854
...and commonwealth to have a vigilant eye how books demean themselves as well as men ; and thereafter to confine, imprison, and do sharpest justice on them...books are not absolutely dead things, but do contain a potency of life in them to be as active as that soul was whose progeny they are ; nay, they do preserve...
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The History of English Literature: With an Outline of the Origin and Growth ...

William Spalding - English literature - 1854 - 414 pages
...commonwealth, to have a vigilant eye how books demean themselves, as well as men ; and thereafter to confme, imprison, and do sharpest justice on them as malefactors : for books are not absolutely dead things, but d< contain a progeny of life in them, to be as active as that soul was whose progeny they are ; nny,...
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The Sunday at Home, Volume 43

1896
...here. ' For books are not absolutely dead things ' — so said Milton — ' but do contain a potency of life in them to be as active as that soul was whose progeny they are. Many a man lives, a burden to the earth, but a good book is the precious life-blood of a master spirit,...
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The British Controversialist and Impartial Inquirer, Volume 5

Great Britain - 1854
...wisdom ; " And books are the legacies they have left us. " Books are not absolutely dead things, but ib contain a progeny of life in them to be as active as that soul was whose progeny they are A good book is the precious life-blood of a master spirit, embalmed and treasured up on purpose to...
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The Eclectic Review

1855
...iustice on them as malefactors; for books are not absolutely dead things, out do contain a potency of life in them to be as active as that soul was whose progeny they are.' — Milton. LONDON: WARD AND CO., PATERNOSTER ROW. W. OLIPHANT AM. SON, KJ>IM;lui;i! : B. JACKSON,...
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The Eclectic Review, Volume 10; Volume 102

Samuel Greatheed, Daniel Parken, Theophilus Williams, Josiah Conder, Thomas Price, Jonathan Edwards Ryland, Edwin Paxton Hood - English literature - 1855
...iustice on them as malefactors; for books are not absolutely dead things, out do contain a potency of life in them to be as active as that soul was whose progeny they an'—MiltoM. LONDON: WAED AND CO., PATERNOSTER ROW. W. OLIPHANT AND SON, EDINBURGH : R. STARK, GLASGOW:...
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The Law Magazine, Or, Quarterly Review of Jurisprudence

Law - 1855
...reported are, like books—to use the emphatic language of Milton—"not absolutely dead things, but they contain a progeny of life in them to be as active as the soul whose progeny they are; nay, they do preserve, as in a vial, the purest efficacy and extraction...
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The Eclectic Review

1856
...and Commonwealth to have a vigilant eye how books demean themselves as well as men, and thereafter to confine, imprison, and do sharpest justice on them...books are not absolutely dead things but do contain a potency of life in them to be as active OB that Ťoul was whose progeny they are." — ffilton. LONDON:...
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The Methodist Review, Volume 8; Volume 16; Volume 38

Methodist Church - 1856
...vigilant eye how books demean themselves as veil as men, and thereafter to confine, imprison, ftnd do sharpest justice on them as malefactors ; for books are not absolutely dead things, but do contain a potency of life in them to be as active as that Bonl was whose progeny they are. — MILTON. (I.) "...
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The Popular lecturer [afterw.] Pitman's Popular lecturer (and ..., Volumes 1-3

Henry Pitman - 1856
...demean themselves as well as men ; for books are not absolutely dead things, but do contain a potency of life in them to be as active as that soul was whose progeny they are." Milton did not forget that unlicensed printing might be productive of some evil, although its general...
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