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" Vice is a monster of so frightful mien, As, to be hated, needs but to be seen; Yet seen too oft, familiar with her face, We first endure, then pity, then embrace. "
English Exercises: Consisting of Exercises in Parsing, Instances of False ... - Page 38
by Lindley Murray - 1847
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Select Poets of Great Britain: To which are Prefixed, Criticial Notices of ...

William Hazlitt - English poetry - 1825 - 562 pages
...? Ask your own heart, and nothing is so plain ; 'Tis to mistake them, eosts the time and pain. Viee <1= then pity, then embraee. But where th' extreme of viee was ne'er agreed : Ask where's the north ? at...
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The works of Samuel Johnson [ed. by F.P. Walesby].

Samuel Johnson - 1825
...appearance, Plutarch had in his hands all the plays of Aristophanes, which were at least fifty in number. ' Vice is a monster of so frightful mien, As, to be hated, needs but to be seen ; Vet seen too ofi, familiar with her face, We 6rst endure, then pity, then embrace. Pope's...
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The British anthology; or, Poetical library, Volumes 3-4

British anthology - 1825
...white ? Ask your own heart, and nothing is so plain ; 'Tis to mistake them costs the time and pain. 5. Vice is a monster of so frightful mien, As to be hated needs but to he seen ; Yet seen too oft, familiar with her face, . We first endure, then pity, then embrace....
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Parents and wives; or, Inconsistency and mistakes

Sarah Green - 1825
...sometimes reverse the picture, and find that bad mothers may produce a good offspring; for often " Vice is a monster of so frightful mien, As to be hated, needs but to be seen;" especially when the naturally virtuous observer is also a victim of vice so unmasked....
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English Exercises: Adapted to Murray's English Grammar, Consisting of ...

Lindley Murray - 1826
...me. This day be bread, and peace, my lot ; All else beneath the sun,* Thou know'st if best l>f stow'd or not, And let thy will be done. Vice is a monster of so frightful mien, As, to be hated, needs but to he seen : Yet seen too oft, familiar with her face, We first endure, then pity, then embrace. If...
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An Inquiry Into the Moral Character of Lord Byron

James Wright Simmons - Literature - 1826 - 99 pages
...and, we doubt not, by that of almost every other man. (i) Analogy of religion. Part I. Chap. V. (fc) Vice is a monster of so frightful mien, As to be hated needs but to be seen ; But seen too oft, familiar with her face, We first endure, then pity, then embrace. ESSAY...
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A General Pronouncing and Explanatory Dictionary of the English Language: To ...

George Fulton - English language - 1826 - 407 pages
...first Une of a couplet generally ends with the rising inflexion, unless the last word be emphatic; as, Vice is a monster of so frightful mien', As to be hated needs hut to be seen'; Yet seen too oft, familiar with her face', We first endure, then pity, then embrace'....
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The History of the Church of Christ: Particularly in Its Lutheran ..., Volume 1

John Scott - Church history - 1826
...are in danger of realizing the observation of the poet : Vice is a monster of so foul a mien As, to be hated, needs but to be seen, Yet, seen too oft, familiar with the face, We first endure, then pity, then embrace. Persecution, it is true, is a crime to which our...
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Captain Rock in London; Or, The Chieftain's Gazette for the Year 1825

Catholics - 1825 - 346 pages
...innocence and virtue.* Well has the poet said, ' Vice is a monster of such frijjhtful mien, Tliut lo be hated needs but to be seen ; Yet seen too oft, familiar will) her fact', At first we pity, and we then embrace.' In the next place, where every thing connected...
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Much Instruction from Little Reading: Or, Extracts from Some of the Most ...

Anthologies - 1827
...oft (more strong than all) the love of ease. ( ***** Vice is a monster of so frightful mein, As, to be hated, needs but to be seen ; Yet seen too oft, familiar with her face, We first endure, then pity, then embrace. * * * * * Virtuous and vicious every man must be, Few in th' extreme, but...
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