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" How many things are there which a man cannot, with any face or comeliness, say or do himself! A man can scarce allege his own merits with modesty, much less extol them ; a man cannot sometimes brook to supplicate or beg; and a number of the like. But... "
Pantologia. A new (cabinet) cyclopędia, by J.M. Good, O. Gregory, and N ... - Page 6
by John Mason Good - 1813
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Male Friendship in Shakespeare and his Contemporaries

Thomas MacFaul - Literary Criticism - 2007
...friendship is, all offices of life are as it were granted to him and his deputy. For he may exercise them by his friend. How many things are there which a man cannot, with any face or comeliness, do himself? A man can scarce allege his own merits with modesty, much less extol them; a man cannot...
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The Case for Greatness: Honorable Ambition and Its Critics

Robert Faulkner - Political Science - 2008 - 288 pages
...governed are but arts of ostentation" (Essayes or Counsels, Civill andMorall, #54 "Of Vain-Glory"); "A man can scarce allege his own merits with modesty, much less extol them, . . . supplicate or beg; . . . But all these things are graceful in a friend's mouth; . . . where a...
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