Detroit, I Do Mind Dying

Front Cover
South End Press, 1998 - History - 254 pages
This new South End Press edition makes available the full text of this out-of-print classic - along with a new foreword by Manning Marable, interviews with participants in DRUM, and reflections on political developments over the past threee decades by Georgakas and Surkin.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - jonfaith - www.librarything.com

This proved to be an early example of how powerful the university could be. this wasn't assigned; I happened upon it while wandering through the stacks. It isn't overly scholarly, it is largely an oral history. It shocked the hell out of me. Read full review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

strange history keeps repeating its self page 28---- whirlpool 90 day hiring scam with manpower temp service still give BLACKS the worse jobs

Contents

Introduction to the First Edition
1
A Prologue
9
Our Thing Is DRUM
23
We Will Take the Hard Line
43
The League of Revolutionary Black Workers
75
Niggermation at Eldon
85
Finally Got the News
107
Black Workers Congress
131
Mr Justin Ravitz Marxist Judge
175
The 54Hour Week
189
Thirty Years Later
203
Four Histories
211
Further Reading
235
Index
241
About South End Press
256
Copyright

STRESS
151

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (1998)

Manning Marable was born in Dayton, Ohio on May 13, 1950. In 1968, he served as the local black newspaper's correspondent and marched along with thousands of others during the funeral procession for Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. He received a bachelor's degree from Earlham College in Indiana, a master's degree from the University of Wisconsin and a doctorate from the University of Maryland. He wrote around 20 books during his lifetime including How Capitalism Underdeveloped Black America, The Great Wells of Democracy: The Meaning of Race in American Life, Speaking Truth to Power: Essays on Race, Resistance and Radicalism, and Malcolm X: A Life of Reinvention. He was a professor of African American studies, history, political science and public affairs at Columbia University. He died from complications of pneumonia on April 1, 2011 at the age of 60.